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“MONEY HAWK’S IN AMERICA SOME DO GET CAUGHT!!!!   Leave a comment

Below you will see two group’s, one is CEO stealing money from there employee’s and the other CEO making 500,000 to 1 million dollar a year to

do service for the poor and homeless.  Some get caught, most don’t, it is a shame in America, where we are strong and can find work and support

our family’s that we have poor, and homeless, in the past 8yr homeless has tripled to a new high, and there are 33% of American’s on food stamp’s

this is higher the 1929 Depression  (DEARB GOD) “HOW CAN WE DO THIS?”

MAYBE IF E LOOK AT THE CEO’S OF AMERICA WE CAN SEE WHAT IS REALLY GOING ON !!!

 

 

 

Top 10 CEOs in Prison: Why’d They Do It?
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Last Updated Jun 15, 2010 1:31 PM EDT
What do Jeff Skilling, Bernie Ebbers, Dennis Kozlowski, John Rigas, Sanjay Kumar, Walter Forbes, Joe Nacchio, Richard Scrushy, Sam Waksal, and Martin Grass all have in common? They were all CEOs of prominent public companies, convicted of big-time corporate fraud and sentenced to lengthy prison terms.
They were all also fabulously wealthy when they committed their crimes. Nevertheless, they risked their careers, families, reputation, wealth, power, everything. And for what? You’ve got to wonder, what motivates rich, high-powered CEOs to unnecessarily risk it all against all logic and ethical principals?
Perhaps their brain circuitry is somehow hard-wired for exceptional success followed by devastating disaster. Or maybe it’s just probability? Maybe x percent of highly successful, super-wealthy CEOs of big companies will turn out to be dysfunctional crooks. Not buying those explanations? Me neither. Let’s see if we can figure out …
What Motivates Rich, Powerful CEOs to Commit Fraud?
Greed. Corporate America is often characterized as the land of greed; why shouldn’t the folks at the top be the greediest of all? Actually, these CEOs risked way more wealth than they stood to gain by their fraudulent actions. I don’t think any amount of money or power would have fulfilled the needs that made them commit these acts.
Arrogance. Sam Waksal of ImClone described himself as arrogant in an interview after his conviction. Perhaps all that power and money makes CEOs feel invincible, untouchable, above the law. And maybe they got caught because, on some level, they knew what they were doing was wrong and wanted to be punished for it. Hmm.
Evil. Well, evil is sort of a philosophical concept. In this context, perhaps it describes the effect the CEO’s actions had on shareholders and employees, but I don’t think it actually describes their behavior. I mean, they didn’t torture little puppies or murder anybody.
Stupidity. Maybe they’re just plain stupid. No, I don’t think so. Most of these people didn’t just fall off the turnip truck. Look at Computer Associates, Enron, ImClone, Qwest, Tyco, WorldCom. These CEOs built huge, successful companies. I don’t buy that any of them were anything but brilliant businessmen.
Personality Disorder. Delusional, narcissistic psychopaths, call them what you want, it sounds like a no-brainer to me. I mean, most of these folks maintained their innocence to the end. That implies compartmentalization so they didn’t actually feel empathy for those affected by their actions. Denial is a powerful thing. Sure sounds like a behavioral disorder to me. Anyway, there’s no denying that each of these men functioned, and functioned exceptionally, until their issues caught up with them.
So, if it’s a behavioral disorder, that sort of begs the biggest question of all: Can you somehow identify these people before they actually commit the crime? Any thoughts on that?
In any case, here are my Top 10 CEOs in Prison:
Jeff Skilling, former CEO of Enron
Serving 24 years for fraud, insider trading, and other crimes related to the collapse of Enron
Bernie Ebbers, former CEO of WorldCom
Serving 25 years for accounting fraud that cost investors over $100 billion
Dennis Kozlowski, former CEO of Tyco Serving 8 to 25 years for stealing $134 million from Tyco
John Rigas, former CEO of Adelphia Communications Serving 25 years for bank, wire, and securities fraud related to the demise of Adelphia
Sanjay Kumar, former CEO of Computer Associates Serving 12 years for obstruction of justice and securities fraud
Walter Forbes, former CEO of Cendant Serving 12 years for fraud
Richard Scrushy, former CEO of HealthSouth Serving 7 years for bribery and mail fraud
Joseph Nacchio, former CEO of Qwest Communications
Serving 6 years for insider trading
Sam Waksal, former CEO of ImClone Served 7 years for securities fraud (released last year)
Martin Grass, former CEO of Rite Aid Served 6 years for fraud and obstruction (just released this year)

Former United Way Chief Guilty In Theft of More Than $600,000
ALEXANDRIA, Va., April 3— A Federal jury today found William Aramony, the former president of United Way of America, guilty of stealing more than $600,000 from the charity and using the money to pay for vacations, luxury apartments and other benefits for himself and his teen-age girlfriend.
The case has been an embarrassment both to the independent United Way organizations and to the charitable sector generally. United Way is one of the country’s biggest charities, raising more than $3 billion through payroll checkoff plans. United Way of America, which Mr. Aramony headed for 22 years, provided the local, independent fund-raising drives with marketing, training and other services.
Elaine Chao, who replaced Mr. Aramony as the president of United Way of America in 1992, said she and her board were gratified by the conviction. “We are glad to have this chapter behind us,” she said. “We’re focused on the future.”
Mr. Aramony faces the possibility of hundreds of thousands of dollars of fines, and a prison term. His lawyer, William Moffitt, said he would appeal the verdict.
Randy I. Bellows, the Assistant United States Attorney who prosecuted the case, said the guilty verdict demonstrated that “when an individual abuses the trust placed in him, society won’t tolerate it.”
“This verdict sends a message to anybody charged with the responsibility for protecting a charity that they will be held accountable,” he said.
The jury’s decision, in the Federal District Court for Eastern Virginia, came in the fifth week of the trial after an unexpectedly long seven days of deliberation. One juror, Alan Hannen, a driver for United Parcel Service, said the jurors had been shocked that no defense witnesses had been presented and felt “even more obligated to go through the paperwork,” as a result.
Mr. Hannen said a good deal of the jury’s time was spent figuring out how to go through the voluminous documents. The prosecution presented nearly 1,000 pieces of evidence, and the defense added several hundred more.
To speed the trial along in a court known as a “rocket docket” the judge was liberal in allowing evidence to be entered but did not allow time to be spent in describing the documents. They should speak for themselves, he said.
Mr. Hannen said the jurors had largely ignored Mr. Aramony’s history of womanizing, but he said the biggest thing on his mind as the jury deliberated was “all the money that went to Lori Villasor,” Mr. Aramony’s young girlfriend, although she did little or no work.
Mr. Moffitt asserted that no one had won a complete victory in the case. He noted that the judge had cut the charges to 46 from 71 before sending the case to the jury.
“We got scarred a little bit, but the Government got scarred a little bit, too,” Mr. Moffitt said.
Mr. Aramony, 67, appeared relaxed and chipper through the trial. He was convicted of 25 of 27 counts of conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, the filing of false income tax returns and transactions involving criminally derived property. He declined to comment.
The jury also found two of Mr. Aramony’s former aides, Thomas J. Merlo, 64, and Stephen J. Paulachak, 49, who had both served as chief financial officer of United Way of America, guilty of diverting charitable funds. It found Mr. Merlo guilty of 17 of 18 counts of conspiracy, fraud and filing of false tax returns, and Mr. Paulachak of 8 of 12 counts.
But the jury said a for-profit spinoff from United Way of America, Partnership Umbrella Inc., which the Government said the men had used as a vehicle for diverting charitable funds, was not guilty of conspiracy to commit tax fraud.
Judge Claude M. Hilton set sentencing for June 14. The maximum possible term for any single count in the case is 10 years.
While the scandal left the people who head charities uneasy, most suggested that Mr. Aramony’s case was an aberration. Many also believe that the oversight of the nonprofit sector could be strengthened. There has been growing attention to the performance of directors and whether they have the skills and time to oversee the nonprofits they are responsible for.
“This case is a lesson to all boards that no matter how much they trust the executive director and have confidence in him or her, they really must perform the oversight function and exercise due diligence,” said Eleanor Brilliant, a professor at the Rutgers University School of Social Work and author of a book about United Way. “The issue of the board’s role has been raised but not fully addressed.”
The governors of United Way of America, who included chief executives of blue chip companies like I.B.M., AT&T and Sears, were portrayed by the Government as victims in this case. The defense, however, suggested that it was they who had slipped up.
They knew exactly what Mr. Aramony was doing, but knew they would have trouble finding another leader as dynamic as he was, Mr. Moffitt said. He noted that Mr. Aramony and Ms. Villasor had stayed together in the home of one of Mr. Aramony’s directors.
As president of United Way of America from 1970 to 1992, when he resigned under pressure, Mr. Aramony had been widely considered a dynamic leader who helped to build the operation by standardizing the name and the approach and bringing valuable advertising strategies and professionalism.
At the time of his departure, United Way of America collected about $29 million in dues from the local campaigns and paid Mr. Aramony about $463,000 in salary and benefits.
When reports surfaced in 1992 that Mr. Aramony had spent money from United Way of America on vacations to London, Paris, Egypt, Las Vegas and elsewhere for himself and his young girlfriend and on apartments for their personal use in Coral Gables, Fla., and on the East Side of Manhattan, donors and volunteers expressed outrage and contributions fell.
The organization brought in Ms. Chao, pared itself down to a leaner entity and introduced stringent financial controls and ethical standards. Local United Way officials say donations are rising.
Mr. Moffitt argued that Mr. Aramony had to maintain a lavish standard of living to persuade chief executives of America’s top companies to work for United Way. He also hammered at the theme that the directors were aware of Mr. Aramony’s behavior and seemed to find it acceptable, until reports started becoming public.
Mr. Moffitt repeatedly admitted that Mr. Aramony had made mistakes in having affairs with women he employed and in “sexually harassing” them, but he said his client was not guilty of taking money meant for charity.
The jury felt otherwise.
Others outside of the courtroom found the verdict appropriate.
“Anyone who abuses the public trust and misuses contributors’ money deserves to pay a harsh penalty,” said James J. Bausch, president of the National Charities Information Bureau.

Out of 3,929 charities reviewed in Charity Navigator’s 2013 CEO Compensation Study, a whopping 78 of the CEOs mentioned reportedly earned salaries between $500,000 and $1 million. The study revealed many donors simply assume these leaders work for free or minimal pay. It’s easy to forget that these large charities are multi-million dollar operations.
Are these high-earning execs pulling a fair salary for their good works, or are their impressive salaries questionable considering the nature of their work?
Several states, including New York, New Jersey, Florida and Massachusetts, have pushed legislation to limit the salary of nonprofit CEOs who accept public funding. Florida pushed for a limit of $129,972, while Massachusetts suggested $500,000 (Forbes). New York Governor Andrew Cuomo told Forbes, “These regulations will allow the state government to identify and stop the few providers that pocket taxpayer dollars rather than use them to serve the public.”
When qualified talent is already earning less than what would be offered by a for-profit company, the issue comes down to a question of whether or not a strong corporate culture is crucial to the success of these charities. In the corporate world, a higher salary results in a greater value. While looking at CEO compensation for these charities is only one number, if their talent results in greater revenue for the organization, the level of income may be justifiable. Take a look at this list of 12 nonprofit CEOs raking in a staggering annual salary, and let us know what you think in the comments section below.

William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Laurance Hoagland Jr., Chief Investment Officer of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation earns a hefty salary of $2.5 million. The Hewlett Foundation has a wide range of goals—reducing global poverty, limiting the risk of climate change, advancing education, improving reproductive health rights and supporting local performing arts. (Huffington Post)
American Cancer Society
John Seffrin, CEO of American Cancer Society, earns $2.1 million, while also serving at the White House on the public health advisory group. The American Cancer Society is the world’s largest voluntary health organization fighting cancer. (Huffington Post)
Boys & Girls Club of America
Roxanne Spillett, President of Boys & Girls Clubs of America, earns $1.8 million at an organization with expenses exceeding $130 million (CNN Money). The Boys & Girls Club provides educational after-school programs for more than 4,000 chapters, serving around 4 million children. (Huffington Post)
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Emily K. Rafferty, President of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, earns nearly $1.5 million. The Met was founded in 1870 to encourage the study and application of fine arts. The Met’s yearly expenses have reached $386 million (CNN Money). (Charity Navigator)
Los Angeles Opera
Placido Domingo, General Director of the Los Angeles Opera earns $1.35 million. Domingo is an opera singer and conductor as well, performing in more than 3,600 shows. Domingo has won twelve Grammy’s and has played a role in three opera films. This charitable CEO played a voice role in Disney’s Beverly Hills Chihuahua. (Huffington Post)
The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts
Michael Kaiser, President of the JFK Center for Performing Arts in Washington D.C., earns $1.348 million. Kaiser previously worked for the Royal Opera House and was a corporate advisor before focusing on the arts, working for clients like GM and IBM. The Kennedy Center seeks the best performers from around the world, while striving to be a leader in arts education. (Huffington Post)
Metropolitan Opera Association
Peter Gelb, General Manager of the Metropolitan Opera Association in New York, earns $1.3 million. The Met Opera hosts more than 200 performances every year with some of the world’s most creative and talented artists worldwide. Gelb has had a lifelong love of the opera. He began working at the Met Opera at 17 years old as an usher. Now, as General Manager, Gelb earns $78K in benefits. The Met Opera is currently undergoing a drop in attendance and severe labor negotiations, discussing cuts of 17 percent their annual compensation (New York Observer). (Huffington Post)
Museum of Modern Art, New York
Glenn Lowry, Chief Executive of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, earns $1.2 million. Notably, the museum raised admission costs in 2012, while the CEO still receives $318K in housing to live free of charge in a $6 million apartment in MoMA’s residential tower. (Huffington Post)
United Way Worldwide
Brian A. Gallagher, President and CEO of United Way Worldwide, earns $1.2 million. United Way was founded in 1887 to transport leaders and support to 41 countries and territories around the world. Groups promote educational and health initiatives to suffering communities. (Charity Navigator)
J. Paul Getty Trust
James Williams, Chief Investment Officer of the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles, earns $1.2 million. The Getty, one of the world’s wealthiest art institutions, is dedicated to carefully presenting and conserving the world’s artistic legacy. After cutting back on several programs and employees and raising parking costs during the recession, Williams was able to maintain his more-than-agreeable salary. (Huffington Post)
National Jewish Health
Michael Salem, President and CEO of National Jewish Health, earns a salary of just over $1 million. National Jewish Health is the leading hospital for respiratory care in the United States. (Charity Navigator)
Goodwill
Michael Miller, CEO of Goodwill, earns $856,043. Goodwill uses donations to train people for jobs who are currently unemployed. After being ridiculed by the Oregon Department of Justice for an “unreasonable” salary, Miller continues with compensation surpassing $850,000. During Miller’s time at Goodwill, he has increased revenue up to 107 percent to a record $135.5 million, while adding 1,000 jobs since 2004. The number of people served through Goodwill has increased from 11,694 to 52,170 during Miller’s leadership, perhaps proving the benefit of well-paid charity CEOs (Portland Business Journal).

Posted July 17, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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The Walking DEAD (HOMELESS PEOPLE) PART 2   Leave a comment

WOULD  YOU RECONIZE A HOMELESS PERSON?

I THINK NOT, because you would have to STOP and look, most people of today want thing’s fast, quick, done over with, that you just don’t see a homeless person.

On a bus around Fayetteville I listen to people when they talk, and many time’s if these normal people see a homeless person on the side of the highway, it is normal for me to hear this. (OH THERE THEY ARE AGAIN BEGGING FOR MONEY FOR THERE DRUG’S) YES some do, but the ones that sit next to a building or out of the way, there more ashamed of what has happen to them, and they are trying to find away out of there problem.

There are so many that will not ask for anything, not even food.  Homeless is new to many of the homeless, and they have no idea what to do, where to go.  I had to go and ask many people where is this, what can be done, how do I do this? it is crazy, most information that I got was from homeless people, sometimes wrong, but at least they tried, most of the food bank’s think you ALREADY KNOW what to do and what there program is all about?

Some of the places, see so many homeless, that they see them all the same, not different in anyway, but I tell you there so different in so many way’s that it would make you cry, some are running away from home, some are looking for a home or family to understand them, some have a family that get’s there SSI money and throw the person that need’s the care out the door.  Some are not smart enough to get SSI, and they live on the street’s, so have a drinking problem and the family can’t deal with them, some have a drug problem and the family can’t deal with them.  Some have mental issues, that a doctor has not given the right drug to help them, some have family that don’t care one way or another.

If you see a person with a backpack walking around 90% chance there homeless, they go to the library, they go to each place that give a hot meal during the day, or walking to the shelter or day center if your town has one.

I had the chance to show some student’s what they will find when they go to a homeless person….”SHOCK” “SCARED” they will try to get out of your way..

When the “POLICE” went to the homeless camp’s, they were loaded to the hilt!!! OMG you would have thought they were going to raid a drug house!!!

These Homeless people, are just people that maybe sleep 2 to 4 hours at night, there scared and these big COP’s run up in the camp early in the morning, I “prayed’ no one will die today!!

When you see a homeless, ask “HA WHAT IS YOUR STORY”

 

ALVIN

 

Posted July 15, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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The Walking DEAD (HOMELESS PEOPLE IN AMERICA)   Leave a comment

As the title say’s the Walking Dead, I think of the last year’s were I walked with the homeless people around Arkansas, and when I went to New York, and Georgia, South Carolina, and Denver.   I want people to see through my eyes, and maybe you will see something you never thought of or ever heard before.  This is away of saying good-by to a friend, he loved his vodka, but not always, he hated it sometimes, and could not be around people that was drinking anything, I find that to be true about homeless people, they hate where they are, but to get that next leg up, is almost impossible,  you feel a rush to find something fast, but a system that moves as slow as a snail going up hill in the winter time.  When what your fighting for does not come, you go back to what you know, and that being drug’s or drinking.  It is easier to drink or do drug’s then to live in the real time, I don’t understand this, but for the time, I listen, and hope I learn with out jumping into those thing’s.  I have heard it all, to “WELL Marijuana is not additive to it CURE’s.  Anything that makes you not know what is going on around you is not good.  We are HUMAN, and that is a hard thing to begin with, the stress of life that we have made for ourselves is overwhelming, so it easy to over look the hazard of drinking and drug’s, But as HUMAN’s we must look at what CAN. that word is a strange word, but it is so TRUE (CAN) we can be more then what we think of ourselves, build thing’s, use part’s of our mind’s that no other creature on EARTH does. When most people see homeless people they only see the outer shell, some ask WHY? I have asked the same question why? over time I found over time most were mom’s and dad’s, they were very smart, they had goal’s, they had real lives.  So to tell you, what changed! many thing’s that fast pace life will catch you, the drug’s slow everything down, the drinking will slow thing’s down and put you in a lot of trouble, Our law’s is another problem, if you have a felony of any kind, then it is hard to find work, you lose creditability.

CO-DEPENDENCY: A big word when you think about it, the origination’s that were made to help people out of a problem, has become a business, where ever a homeless person go’s there is a sign-in sheet, to prove that they have helped people. Most of them turn this in for “GRANT MONEY”” I call them Money Hawk’s” they can only give enough to keep the poor and homeless enough to stay alive today.  Some is a small bag every two week’s some are one time a month. some is just a hot meal for the day.

HOMELESS CENSES:  a BIG JOKE, they ask question so not to show light on the real problem, the question’s are made to see where some group’s can pull more money (Money Hawk’s) again.  The number’s are so wrong, if it was not so serious I would laugh, there are three times what they think there is, many find shelter at a friends home, or a barn, or a abandon building, never see a censes taker, The group that made the CENSES what’s the problem to be small.   When in fact it is to big for them to understand.

PAN-HANDLING:  IT IS TRUE THERE ARE SOME THAT PAN-HANDLE THAT ARE VERY RICH.  But there are many that are not, they don’t even have two penny’s to rub together, If you see a homeless not waving a sign, he most likely is homeless and has nothing, the ones that show off, most are just trying to make money with out working for it, the ones with a sign, I will give money to, the one with sign I will give food.

Posted July 15, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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“This program was recently reauthorized by Congress after extensive hearings and debate.   Leave a comment

alvindavis99

“SO” Congress said it was “OK” to read your “EMAILS” How sick is “AMERICA?” “VERY” “SICK” I think, please people wake-up and scream at congress and the companys allowing this to happen.

Prism

A slide depicting the top-secret PRISM program.

The National Security Agency has obtained direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other US internet giants, according to a top secret document obtained by the Guardian.

The NSA access is part of a previously undisclosed program called Prism, which allows officials to collect material including search history, the content of emails, file transfers and live chats, the document says.

The Guardian has verified the authenticity of the document, a 41-slide PowerPoint presentation – classified as top secret with no distribution to foreign allies – which was apparently used to train intelligence operatives on the capabilities of the program. The document claims “collection directly from the servers” of…

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Posted April 5, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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Captain English !!!!!!!! tell me what you think?   Leave a comment

alvindavis99

imgT2

You liked your own post on CAPTAIN ENGLISH

You’re so vain. You probably think “YOU” Want to “DATE” A Filipina? is about you.

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Posted April 5, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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NFL Black MEN arrested all the time “WHY”   Leave a comment

alvindavis99

NFL PLAYER ARRESTS: SHOWING 732 Record(s)

DateTeamNamePOSCaseCategoryDescriptionOutcome
2014-09-17ARIJonathan DwyerRBArrestedDomestic violenceSuspected of aggravated assault in incident involving woman.Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-09-11MINAdrian PetersonRBIndictedChild abuseGrand jury in Texas indicted Peterson on a charge of injury to a child.Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-09-04NYJQuincy EnunwaWRArrestedDomestic violenceCharged with simple assault after alleged incident with woman at hotel in Florham Park, N.J.Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-08-30SFRay McDonaldDEArrestedDomestic violenceSuspected of domestic violence against pregnant fiance, who showed police bruising on her body.Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-08-23BUFAlan BranchDTArrestedDUIAccused of drunken driving, blood-alcohol content of 0.14, after police say they noticed him vomiting out of car door.Resolution undetermined. Team released him the next day.Black man
2014-08-20PITLe’Veon BellRBArrested

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Posted April 5, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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A WHOLE MONTH TEACHING ESL STUDENTS READ!!!!!!!   Leave a comment

www.homelessnessolutions.com

BY TEACHER ALVIN ON OCT 21, 2014imgT2

ENG INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE CENTER

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE
RESOURCE BOOK: PRONUNCIATION PAIRS LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING,PRONUNCIATION, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

Nickname ALVIN DAVIS
Nationality AMERICAN
Major: ESL TEACHER
Subject PRONUNCIATION
COURSE OBJECTIVES

This one month class is to learn to speak American English with a clear sounding of the words, to be able to speak to other people and have them understand what you are talking about, not slurred, or with slang.

Suggestions / Recommendations

Pronunciation Pairs: (To say the words very clearly), (To Remember to sound the words very clearly),

(To say the correct “ED” sound and the correct “S” “IZ” or “Z” sounds), (To say with the correct Intonations),

(Flow of the words together), (To put the emotions into your words), (To find the sounds that change in a word).

(To stress on words that have a different meaning), (To show excitement with some parts of speech).

Course Outline

Week 1 – Students will begin the class with a basic pronunciation test which will cover all vowel and consonant sounds as well as consonant clusters. From the students performance on this test individual vowel and consonant sounds will be identified and targeted for classroom learning. More complicated consonant combinations as well as past tense verb and plurals “S” endings will be practiced and reviewed.

Step 01: One hour of Pronunciation Pairs. Five Units per hour, will improve there pronunciation level in one week, each week will build confidence in there ability to speak and understand the new vocabulary of English.

Week 2 – Students will be introduced to word stress. As a means of teaching this students will learn syllable count, prefix and suffix pronunciation and compound word pronunciation and stress. Students will begin to learn higher aspects of American accent word stress and reduction of pronouns and modals.

Step 01: One hour of Grammar, will help the student start saying sentence patterns, this week will be the growing of Pronunciation with Vocabulary words. The American accent and word stress and reduction of pronouns will also be used to help the student understanding the forms of America stress and other country’s English.

Step 02: One Hour of Pronunciation. Continuing the Five Units per hour with now the Grammar you will start to see the students using the English outside of the classroom.

Week 3 – Students will work on English rhythm patterns to include highlighting stressed words within a sentence, thought groups and usual patterns of speech associated with pronouns, articles, contractions and prepositions. A closer look will be taken at phrasal verbs and descriptive devices such as simile and metaphor.

Step 01: Reading, Writing, listening. One hour of Reading, Writing, listening, will play a roll in the developing of the student’s interest in the English language as well as the understanding of “WHY” when a student can understand the why of English they start learning at a faster pace.

Step 02: One hour of Pronunciation. Continuing the Five Units per hour with now the Grammar, Reading, Writing, Listening, you will start to see the students using the English outside of the classroom even more then the first two weeks.

Week 4 –Students will be introduced to Intonation. Listing intonation, question/tag question and drop-rise intonation. Pitch range and expressive intonation will be covered. Blending, reduction and higher level English speaking skills useful in IELTs, TOEIC and TOEFL will be learned.

Step 01: Review, It is important for the student to review all that they have learned, and the mistakes that the teacher now can correct and get the student to remember the correct way to Speak, Read, Write, Listen and use the proper Grammar.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE

RESOURCE BOOK: BASICGRAMMAR IN USE LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE, TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Grammar is important because it is the language that makes it possible for us to talk about language. Grammar names the types of words and word groups that make up sentencesnot only in English but in any language. As human beings, we can put sentences together even as children–we can all do grammar. But to be able to talk about how sentences are built, about the types of words and word groups that make up sentences–that is knowing about grammar. And knowing about grammar offers a window into the human mind and into our amazingly complex mental capacity. People associate grammar with errors and correctness. But knowing about grammar also helps us understand what makes sentences and paragraphs clear and interesting and precise. Grammar can be part of literature discussions, when we and our students closely read the sentences in poetry and stories. And knowing about grammar means finding out that all languages and all dialects follow grammatical patterns.

GRAMMAR: To Learn English Grammar and how the differences are between learning English in it true form. The English Language has many different parts of Grammar and to understand each part it must be done one step at a time.

Suggestions / Recommendation:

Basic Grammar in Use: (To learn Grammar is a short time and to insure that the Grammar can be used in a formal and a business setting). To learn all the parts of Grammar, Present, Past, Present Perfect, Passive,

Verb Forms, Future, Modals, Imperatives, Auxiliary Verbs, Questions, Reported Speech, Pronouns, Possessives, Determiners, and Pronouns, with Adjectives and Adverbs, Prepositions, Two Word Verbs,

Conjunctions and Clauses.

Course Outline

  1. Week 1 – Students will begin the class with a basic grammar in use test. If they are a beginner then they will start at the Unit 01. AM/IS/ARE, This will start them learning the Positive and Negative with sentence structure and where to use them. (That’s=That is There’s=There is) they will do the exercises 1.1 to 1.6. Start: Unit 2. Exercises 2.1 to 2.5 (Questions) How to ask questions. Unit 3. Exercises 3.1 to 3.4 (Present Continuous) In these Exercises there are complete the sentences with a follow up with the teachers and with there homework. Writing about a small picture and using the proper Grammar, also writing about true sentences. Students will start Learning (Present Continuous Questions) this will build there Grammar at a faster pace. Unit 4 – 4.1 to 4.4 Exercises looking at the picture and write the proper questions to be asked in the conversation. Unit 5 – (Simple Present) Exercises 5.1 to 5.5 using Verbs. Asking Questions to other students and staff. Students will began learning (Simple Present Negative) Unit 6 Exercise 6.1 to 6.5 This will be writing negative sentences, study the information and write sentence with like, putting the verb in the correct form (Positive or Negative) Unit 7- 7.1 to 7.4 (Simple Present Questions) Write Questions also using the verbs. Write true short answers. Unit 8 – 8.1 to 8.3 (Present Continuous and Simple Present) using Present Continuous in the proper way of a sentence structure. Week 2 – Unit 9 using 9.1 to 9.4 Exercises Rewriting sentences with (got) (have) (do’s and don’t) Unit 10 is using Was/Were will be doing (Positive) (Negative) (Questions) with short answers. Start learning the correct order of the sentence. Unit 11 (Simple Past) Exercises 11.1 to 11.2 will use simple past of the verb usage. Fill in the blanks with the proper verb and Simple Past forms. Unit 12 (Simple Past Negative and Questions) Exercise 12.1 to 12.5 Complete the sentences with the proper past tense words putting the verb in the correct form. Week 3 – Unit 13 (Past Continuous) Exercises 13.1 to 13.4 looking at the picture and fill in the blanks. What did the student do? In past continuous form, complete the questions. Unit 14 (Past Continuous and Simple Past) Unit 15 (I Used to ) Unit 16 (present Perfect) Unit 17 (Simple Present and Present Perfect) Unit 18 (For, Since, Ago) Unit 19 (I Have Done and I Did). Week 4 – Unit 20 (Just, Already, and Yet) Unit 21 (I’ve Lost My Key,) Unit 22 (Passive) Unit 23 (Is Being Done) Unit 24 (Be, Have, do, in Present and Past) Unit 25 (Regular and Irregular Verbs) Unit 26 (What Are You Doing?) Unit 27 (I’m Going To) Unit 28 (Will) Unit 29 (I’ll, Will) Unit 30 (Might) Unit 31 (Can and Could) Unit 32 (Must)
  2. This is where we will start the review. The review is very important to show what the student has really learned. There will be a Grammar test to show how much the student has learned.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: WRITING LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

MORE STEPS TO WRITTING: To Learn English Writing and how the differences are between learning English in it true form. The English Language has many different parts of Writing and to understand each part it must be done one step at a time.

Suggestions / Recommendation:

More Steps to Writing: To establish writing skill’s for Business, a Contract, a E-Mail, just about anything you will need the ability to write in some form or another. Even though we live in a computer age there are still many things that need to be written or typed correctly.

Week 1- Unit 01 (Sports) Descriptive Composition Unit 02 (Entertainment) Informal Letter Unit 03 (Relationships) Discursive Composition

WeeK 2- Unit 04 (Emergencies) Short Story Unit 05 (Travel) Letter to a friend Unit 06 (Health and Fitness) Report Writing

Week 3- Unit 07 (Employment) Article Unit 08 (City and Country life) Discursive Composition

Week 4- Review, make sure of all the spelling of each thing that is done, Grammar, and content will be the best for the student to learn how to write a good report, letter, e-mail.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE

RESOURCE BOOK: EnglishVOCABULARY in Use LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, ESL TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: To teach the student a group of vocabulary words and how to use them in a sentence with the proper Grammar, and to understand the definition of vocabulary words and how to use them in different ways. English has a vast way of using the vocabulary words, so by teaching them how to use them in different situations will increase the ability to use them correctly.

Book: English Vocabulary in Use:

(Everyday Verbs) (Words and Grammar) (People) (The World) (At Home) (School and Workplace) (Leisure) (Social Issues)

Week 1: Everyday Verbs, Using language Words, Talking About Language, Learning Vocabulary, Learn words in Family, Picture and Diagrams, Exercises, 2.1 to 9.5

Week 2: (Bring) (Get) (Phrasal Verbs) (Everyday Things) (Talking) (Moving) (Conjunctions) (Time Words) (Places) Exercises, 10.1 to 18.5

Week 3: (Manner) (Irregular Verbs) (Common Uncountable Words) (Common Adjective Good and Bad) (Words and Prepositions) (Prefixes) Exercises, 19.1 to 25.6

Week 4: Review Exercises 2.1 to 25.6, Test, and correct the mistakes the student are making.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Intro provides numerous opportunities for high beginning students to actively learn contemporary American English expressions. This text is also appropriate for vocabulary courses. – Expressions are presented in interesting contexts — i.e., speaking on a car phone, being afraid to talk in school — and are spiralled through natural dialogues and listening activities. – Learning strategies, such as vocabulary indexing and clustering, focus students on becoming independent learners. – Activities include games, cartoons, role-plays, surveys, and dictations, as well as listening and writing activities that appeal to a wide range of learning styles.

SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION:

The SLE (Speaking, Listening, Expression) program is a conversation program for adult and young adult learners of English as a foreign language. It aims to improve learners’ communicative competence through an emphasis on interaction. It enables learners to acquire and practice using important functions and expressions in natural contexts while, at the same time, stimulating conversation related to various topics and real-life situations. It utilizes a number of communicative approaches to language learning in order to facilitate the learners’ timely and effective acquisition of English. The aim of the program is to improve learners’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills as well as their vocabulary and grammar skills. The SLE series provides learners with the tools they need to use their newly acquired language skills in the real world. It aims to help build learners’ confidence in using English outside the classroom by increasing their understanding of and involvement in the learning process. Most importantly, the SLE series will challenge learners and help them believe in themselves. All learners participating in the SLE program will be able take the Pagoda motto to heart. Week 1: (Nice to Meet You) (What’s your Favorite?) (Time is on my Side) (What are you doing Nowadays?) (Weather and Seasons) (Red Letter Day) (There’s still a lot Left)

Week 2: (All in the Family) (The Future is Bright) What Happened?) (I can Do It!) (Nice Suit) (Not Just Another Pretty Face) (Learning the Ins and Outs) (Wild Kingdom)

Week 3: (Would You Rather?) (Growing Up) (That Sounds Fine) (Give Me One good Reason) (Home is Where the Heart is)

Week 4: Review, Test, and correct the mistakes from each Unit, make sure there is no questions that are not answered.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: READING ADVANTAGE LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: what a language objective is

  • steps that teachers can take to create language objectives
  • how to implement language objectives in a general education classroom
  • how to align objectives to content and language standards
  • articulate for learners the academic language functions and skills that they need to master to fully participate in the lesson and meet the grade-level content standards.
  • are beneficial not only for language learners but for all students in a class, as everyone can benefit from the clarity that comes with a teacher outlining the requisite academic language to be learned and mastered in each lesson.

Week 1: (Reading Comprehension) (Idioms) (Vocabulary Reinforcement) (Target Vocabulary) (What do you Think?) (Video Jockeys) (Coffee Culture) (Around the World)

Week 2: Review last week progress and (Test) (The Puffer Fish) (Getting Married) (Say It with Flowers) (Bollywood) (The Nobel Prize)

Week 3: Review last week progress and (Test) (A Funny Cure) (Palm Reading) (Amazing Memory) (Incredible Dogs) (Diamonds)

Week 4: Review last week progress and (Test) (Space Explorers) (Happy New Year) (Text Messaging) (Urban Legends)

08:00 to 08:50: Pronunciation Pairs

09:00 to 09:50:Basic Grammar in Use

10:00 to 10:50: More Steps to Writing

11:00 to 11:50: EnglishVOCABULARY in Use

12:00 to 13:00: Lunch

13:00 to 13:50: SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION

14:00 to 14:50: READING ADVANTAGE

15:00 to 16:50: Optional Classes (POP) (MOVIES) (SURVIVAL) (PATTERN) (CNN) (BUSINESS) (PRESENTATION)

Posted October 22, 2014 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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