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IN A “NUTSHELL” 2.5 MILLION PEOPLE “DIE” IN AMERICA PER YEAR!!!   Leave a comment

National Vital Statistics Report

February 16, 2016
Deaths: Final Data for 2013

Objectives—This report presents final 2013 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Methods—Information reported on death certificates, which are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Results—In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, a record low figure, but the decrease in 2013 from 2012 was not statistically significant. Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years, the same as in 2012. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2013 from 2012 for age groups 15–24 and 75–84. Age-specific death rates increased only for age group 55–64. The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 remained the same as in 2012, although Accidents (unintentional injuries), the 5th leading cause of death in 2012, became the 4th leading cause in 2013, while Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), the 4th leading cause in 2012, became the 5th leading cause of death in 2013. The infant mortality rate of 5.96 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2013 was a historically low value, but it was not significantly different from the 2012 rate. Conclusions—Although statistically unchanged from 2012, the decline in the age-adjusted death rate is consistent with long-term trends in mortality. Life expectancy in 2013 remained the same as in 2012. Keywords: mortality • cause of death • life expectancy • vital
statistics

Highlights
Mortality experience in 2013
• In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States. • The age-adjusted death rate, which accounts for the aging of the population, was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population. • Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years. • The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 were: 1. Diseases of heart (heart disease) 2. Malignant neoplasms (cancer) 3. Chronic lower respiratory diseases 4. Accidents (unintentional injuries) 5. Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke) 6. Alzheimer’s disease 7. Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) 8. Influenza and pneumonia 9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (kidney disease) 10. Intentional self-harm (suicide) 11. Septicemia 12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis 13. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (hypertension) 14. Parkinson’s disease 15. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids • In 2013, the infant mortality rate was 5.96 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. • The 10 leading causes of infant death were: 1. Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (congenital malformations) 2. Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified (low birth weight)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Health Statistics
National Vital Statistics System

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3. Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy (maternal complications) 4. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) 5. Accidents (unintentional injuries) 6. Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes (cord and placental complications) 7. Bacterial sepsis of newborn 8. Respiratory distress of newborn 9. Diseases of the circulatory system 10. Neonatal hemorrhage
Trends • The age-adjusted death rate declined to a record low in 2013, although the decrease from 2012 to 2013 was not significant. • Life expectancy for the total population was 78.8 years in 2013, the same as in 2012. • Life expectancy did not change for any of the major race and ethnicity populations from 2012 to 2013. • Life expectancy for females was 4.8 years higher than for males. The difference in life expectancy between the sexes has narrowed since 1979, when it was 7.8 years, but it has remained at 4.8 years since 2010. • The 15 leading causes of death were the same in 2013 as they were in 2012, although unintentional injuries and stroke exchanged positions in the ranking. • Age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly in 2013 from 2012 for 4 of the 15 leading causes of death and increased for 6 of the 15 leading causes. • Rates for the two leading causes—heart disease and cancer— continued their long-term decreasing trends. Significant decreases also occurred for stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. Significant increases occurred in 2013 from 2012 for Chronic lower respiratory diseases, Influenza and pneumonia, Septicemia, Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, hypertension, and Parkinson’s disease. • Within external causes of injury death, unintentional poisoning was the leading mechanism of injury mortality in 2013, followed by unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries. During 2002–2010, unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries was the leading mechanism of injury mortality, followed by unintentional poisoning, but beginning in 2011, the number of deaths from unintentional poisoning was higher than the number from unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries; see CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) at http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html. • Differences in mortality between the non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white populations persisted. The age-adjusted death rate was 1.2 times greater for the non-Hispanic black population than for the non-Hispanic white population. • The differences in life expectancy among the Hispanic, nonHispanic white, and non-Hispanic black populations in 2013 were the same as in 2012. The difference in life expectancy between the non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white populations was 3.8 years, between the non-Hispanic black and Hispanic populations was 6.5 years, and between the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations was 2.7 years.
• The infant mortality rate declined 0.3% in 2013 from 2012, to a record low of 5.96 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, but the decline was not statistically significant. Introduction This report presents detailed 2013 data on deaths and death rates according to a number of demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among residents of the United States by such variables as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Information on these mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and wellbeing of the U.S. population (1). Separate companion reports present additional details on leading causes of death and life expectancy in the United States (2,3). Mortality data in this report can be used to monitor and evaluate the health status of the United States in terms of current mortality levels and long-term mortality trends, as well as to identify segments of the U.S. population at greater risk of death from specific diseases and injuries. Differences in death rates among various demographic subpopulations, including race and ethnicity groups, may reflect subpopulation differences in factors such as socioeconomic status, access to medical care, and the prevalence of specific risk factors in a particular subpopulation. Methods Data in this report are based on information from all resident death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 99% of deaths occurring in this country are believed to be registered (4). Tables showing data by state also provide information for Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Northern Marianas). Cause-of-death statistics presented in this report are classified in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10) (5). A discussion of the cause-of-death classification is provided in Technical Notes at the end of the report. Mortality data on specific demographic and medical characteristics cover all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Measures of mortality in this report include the number of deaths; crude, agespecific, and age-adjusted death rates; infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates; life expectancy; and rate ratios. Changes in death rates in 2013 compared with 2012, and differences in death rates across demographic groups in 2013, are tested for statistical significance. Unless otherwise specified, reported differences are statistically significant. Additional information on these statistical methods, random variation and relative standard error, the computation of derived statistics and rates, population denominators, and the definition of terms is presented in Technical Notes. The populations used to calculate death rates shown in this report for 1991–2013 were produced under a collaborative arrangement with the U.S. Census Bureau. Populations for 2010–2013 and the intercensal period 2001–2009 are consistent with the 2010 census (6–10). Reflecting the latest guidelines issued in 1997 by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the 2000 and 2010 censuses included an option for persons to report more than one race as appropriate for themselves and household members (11); see Technical Notes for
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detailed information on the 2013 multiple-race reporting area and methods used to bridge responses for those who report more than one race. Beginning with deaths occurring in 2003, some states allowed for multiple-race reporting on the death certificate. Multiple-race data for these states are bridged to single-race categories; see Technical Notes. Once all states are collecting data on race according to the 1997 OMB guidelines, use of the bridged-race algorithm is expected to be discontinued. The population data used to compile death rates by race in this report are based on special estimation procedures and are not true counts (see Technical Notes, ‘‘Race and Hispanic origin’’). This is the case even for the 2000 and 2010 populations. The estimation procedures used to develop these populations contain some error. Smaller population groups are affected much more than larger population groups (12). Data presented in this report and other mortality tabulations are available from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) website, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm. Availability of mortality microdata is described in Technical Notes.
Results and Discussion
Deaths and death rates In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States—53,714 more deaths than in 2012. The crude death rate for 2013 (821.5 deaths per 100,000 population) was 1.4% higher than the 2012 rate (810.2) (Tables A, 1, 3, 4, 14, and 15). The age-adjusted death rate in 2013 was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population—a record low value, although it was notsignificantlydifferentfrom2012(Table 1).Age-adjusteddeathrates are constructs that show what the level of mortality would be if no changes occurred in the age composition of the population from year to year. (For a discussion of age-adjusted death rates, see Technical Notes.) Thus, age-adjusted death rates are better indicators than unadjusted (crude) death rates for examining changes in the risk of death over a period of time when the age distribution of the population is changing. Age-adjusted death rates also are better indicators of relative risk when comparing mortality across geographic areas or between sex or race subgroups of the population that have different age distributions; see Technical Notes. Since 1980, the age-adjusted death rate has decreased significantly every year except 1983, 1985, 1988, 1993, 1999, 2005, 2008, and 2013 (Figure 1 and Table 1). Race—In 2013, age-adjusted death rates for the major race groups (Table 1) were: • White population: 731.0 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population • Black population: 860.8 In 2013, the age-adjusted death rate for the black population was 1.2 times that for the white population (Table B). The average risk of death for the black population was 17.8% higher than for the white population (Table 1). From 1960 through 1982, rates for the black and white populations declined by similar percentages (22.6% and 26.5%, respectively). From 1983 through 1988, rates diverged,
increasing 3.5% for the black population and decreasing 2.0% for the white population. The disparity in age-adjusted death rates between the black and white populations was greatest from 1988 through 1996 (1.4 times greater for the black population). Since 1996, the disparity between the two populations has narrowed, as the age-adjusted rate for the black population declined 27.0% while the rate for the white population declined 15.9% (Table 1 and Figure 2). In 2013, age-adjusted death rates did not change significantly for major race and sex groups compared with 2012 (Tables A and 1). In general, age-adjusted death rates declined from 1980 through 2013 for white males and females and for black males and females. The rate decreased an average of 1.3% per year for white males, 0.7% for white females, 1.4% for black males, and 1.1% for black females during 1980–2013 (Table 1). Rates for the American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) and Asian or Pacific Islander (API) populations should be interpreted with caution because of reporting problems regarding correct identification of race on both the death certificate and in population censuses and surveys (13). Counts of deaths for the AIAN population are substantially underreported (by about 30%) on the death certificate relative to selfreporting while alive (13). Thus, the age-adjusted death rates that are shown for the AIAN population (e.g., Tables 1 and 16) do not lend themselves to valid comparisons against other races. Year-to-year trends for the AIAN population present valid insight into changes in mortality affecting this group, if it is reasonable to assume that the level of underreporting of AIAN deaths has remained more or less constant over past years (13). The age-adjusted death rate for the AIAN population fluctuated from 1980 through 1999, peaking in 1993 at 796.4 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population (Table 1). Since 1999, the rate has trended downward, declining 24.2% from 1999 to 2013. The rate for the AIAN population decreased 0.6% from 2012 (595.3) to 2013 (591.7), although the change was not significant (Table A). In 2013, the age-adjusted death rate for the API population was 405.4 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population. The level of underreporting of deaths for the API population (about 7%) is not as high as for the AIAN population (13), but this underreporting still creates enough of a challenge that any comparisons of this population with other races must be interpreted with caution. The age-adjusted death rate for the API population peaked at 586.5 in 1985. The rate fluctuated from 1985 through 1993 before starting a persistent downward trend, decreasing 28.3% from 1993 to 2013 (Table 1). Hispanic origin—Problems of race and Hispanic-origin reporting affect Hispanic death rates and the comparison of rates for the Hispanic and non-Hispanic populations; see Technical Notes. Mortality for Hispanics is somewhat understated because of net underreporting of Hispanic origin on the death certificate (by an estimated 5%), while the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations are not affected by problems of underreporting (13,14); see Technical Notes. Underreporting of Hispanic origin on the death certificate is relatively stable across age groups (13). The age-adjusted death rate in 2013 was 535.4 for the Hispanic population, 747.1 for the non-Hispanic white population, and 885.2 for
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Table A. Percentage change in death rates and age-adjusted death rates in 2013 from 2012, by age, race, and sex: United States [

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