Archive for the ‘Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH — Edit Tagged with Adjective’ Tag

IN A “NUTSHELL” 2.5 MILLION PEOPLE “DIE” IN AMERICA PER YEAR!!!   Leave a comment

National Vital Statistics Report

February 16, 2016
Deaths: Final Data for 2013

Objectives—This report presents final 2013 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Methods—Information reported on death certificates, which are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Results—In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, a record low figure, but the decrease in 2013 from 2012 was not statistically significant. Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years, the same as in 2012. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2013 from 2012 for age groups 15–24 and 75–84. Age-specific death rates increased only for age group 55–64. The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 remained the same as in 2012, although Accidents (unintentional injuries), the 5th leading cause of death in 2012, became the 4th leading cause in 2013, while Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), the 4th leading cause in 2012, became the 5th leading cause of death in 2013. The infant mortality rate of 5.96 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2013 was a historically low value, but it was not significantly different from the 2012 rate. Conclusions—Although statistically unchanged from 2012, the decline in the age-adjusted death rate is consistent with long-term trends in mortality. Life expectancy in 2013 remained the same as in 2012. Keywords: mortality • cause of death • life expectancy • vital
statistics

Highlights
Mortality experience in 2013
• In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States. • The age-adjusted death rate, which accounts for the aging of the population, was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population. • Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years. • The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 were: 1. Diseases of heart (heart disease) 2. Malignant neoplasms (cancer) 3. Chronic lower respiratory diseases 4. Accidents (unintentional injuries) 5. Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke) 6. Alzheimer’s disease 7. Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) 8. Influenza and pneumonia 9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (kidney disease) 10. Intentional self-harm (suicide) 11. Septicemia 12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis 13. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (hypertension) 14. Parkinson’s disease 15. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids • In 2013, the infant mortality rate was 5.96 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. • The 10 leading causes of infant death were: 1. Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (congenital malformations) 2. Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified (low birth weight)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Health Statistics
National Vital Statistics System

2 National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64 No. 2, February 16, 2016
3. Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy (maternal complications) 4. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) 5. Accidents (unintentional injuries) 6. Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes (cord and placental complications) 7. Bacterial sepsis of newborn 8. Respiratory distress of newborn 9. Diseases of the circulatory system 10. Neonatal hemorrhage
Trends • The age-adjusted death rate declined to a record low in 2013, although the decrease from 2012 to 2013 was not significant. • Life expectancy for the total population was 78.8 years in 2013, the same as in 2012. • Life expectancy did not change for any of the major race and ethnicity populations from 2012 to 2013. • Life expectancy for females was 4.8 years higher than for males. The difference in life expectancy between the sexes has narrowed since 1979, when it was 7.8 years, but it has remained at 4.8 years since 2010. • The 15 leading causes of death were the same in 2013 as they were in 2012, although unintentional injuries and stroke exchanged positions in the ranking. • Age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly in 2013 from 2012 for 4 of the 15 leading causes of death and increased for 6 of the 15 leading causes. • Rates for the two leading causes—heart disease and cancer— continued their long-term decreasing trends. Significant decreases also occurred for stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. Significant increases occurred in 2013 from 2012 for Chronic lower respiratory diseases, Influenza and pneumonia, Septicemia, Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, hypertension, and Parkinson’s disease. • Within external causes of injury death, unintentional poisoning was the leading mechanism of injury mortality in 2013, followed by unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries. During 2002–2010, unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries was the leading mechanism of injury mortality, followed by unintentional poisoning, but beginning in 2011, the number of deaths from unintentional poisoning was higher than the number from unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries; see CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) at http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html. • Differences in mortality between the non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white populations persisted. The age-adjusted death rate was 1.2 times greater for the non-Hispanic black population than for the non-Hispanic white population. • The differences in life expectancy among the Hispanic, nonHispanic white, and non-Hispanic black populations in 2013 were the same as in 2012. The difference in life expectancy between the non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white populations was 3.8 years, between the non-Hispanic black and Hispanic populations was 6.5 years, and between the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations was 2.7 years.
• The infant mortality rate declined 0.3% in 2013 from 2012, to a record low of 5.96 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, but the decline was not statistically significant. Introduction This report presents detailed 2013 data on deaths and death rates according to a number of demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among residents of the United States by such variables as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Information on these mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and wellbeing of the U.S. population (1). Separate companion reports present additional details on leading causes of death and life expectancy in the United States (2,3). Mortality data in this report can be used to monitor and evaluate the health status of the United States in terms of current mortality levels and long-term mortality trends, as well as to identify segments of the U.S. population at greater risk of death from specific diseases and injuries. Differences in death rates among various demographic subpopulations, including race and ethnicity groups, may reflect subpopulation differences in factors such as socioeconomic status, access to medical care, and the prevalence of specific risk factors in a particular subpopulation. Methods Data in this report are based on information from all resident death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 99% of deaths occurring in this country are believed to be registered (4). Tables showing data by state also provide information for Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Northern Marianas). Cause-of-death statistics presented in this report are classified in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10) (5). A discussion of the cause-of-death classification is provided in Technical Notes at the end of the report. Mortality data on specific demographic and medical characteristics cover all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Measures of mortality in this report include the number of deaths; crude, agespecific, and age-adjusted death rates; infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates; life expectancy; and rate ratios. Changes in death rates in 2013 compared with 2012, and differences in death rates across demographic groups in 2013, are tested for statistical significance. Unless otherwise specified, reported differences are statistically significant. Additional information on these statistical methods, random variation and relative standard error, the computation of derived statistics and rates, population denominators, and the definition of terms is presented in Technical Notes. The populations used to calculate death rates shown in this report for 1991–2013 were produced under a collaborative arrangement with the U.S. Census Bureau. Populations for 2010–2013 and the intercensal period 2001–2009 are consistent with the 2010 census (6–10). Reflecting the latest guidelines issued in 1997 by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the 2000 and 2010 censuses included an option for persons to report more than one race as appropriate for themselves and household members (11); see Technical Notes for
3 National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64 No. 2, February 16, 2016
detailed information on the 2013 multiple-race reporting area and methods used to bridge responses for those who report more than one race. Beginning with deaths occurring in 2003, some states allowed for multiple-race reporting on the death certificate. Multiple-race data for these states are bridged to single-race categories; see Technical Notes. Once all states are collecting data on race according to the 1997 OMB guidelines, use of the bridged-race algorithm is expected to be discontinued. The population data used to compile death rates by race in this report are based on special estimation procedures and are not true counts (see Technical Notes, ‘‘Race and Hispanic origin’’). This is the case even for the 2000 and 2010 populations. The estimation procedures used to develop these populations contain some error. Smaller population groups are affected much more than larger population groups (12). Data presented in this report and other mortality tabulations are available from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) website, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm. Availability of mortality microdata is described in Technical Notes.
Results and Discussion
Deaths and death rates In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States—53,714 more deaths than in 2012. The crude death rate for 2013 (821.5 deaths per 100,000 population) was 1.4% higher than the 2012 rate (810.2) (Tables A, 1, 3, 4, 14, and 15). The age-adjusted death rate in 2013 was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population—a record low value, although it was notsignificantlydifferentfrom2012(Table 1).Age-adjusteddeathrates are constructs that show what the level of mortality would be if no changes occurred in the age composition of the population from year to year. (For a discussion of age-adjusted death rates, see Technical Notes.) Thus, age-adjusted death rates are better indicators than unadjusted (crude) death rates for examining changes in the risk of death over a period of time when the age distribution of the population is changing. Age-adjusted death rates also are better indicators of relative risk when comparing mortality across geographic areas or between sex or race subgroups of the population that have different age distributions; see Technical Notes. Since 1980, the age-adjusted death rate has decreased significantly every year except 1983, 1985, 1988, 1993, 1999, 2005, 2008, and 2013 (Figure 1 and Table 1). Race—In 2013, age-adjusted death rates for the major race groups (Table 1) were: • White population: 731.0 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population • Black population: 860.8 In 2013, the age-adjusted death rate for the black population was 1.2 times that for the white population (Table B). The average risk of death for the black population was 17.8% higher than for the white population (Table 1). From 1960 through 1982, rates for the black and white populations declined by similar percentages (22.6% and 26.5%, respectively). From 1983 through 1988, rates diverged,
increasing 3.5% for the black population and decreasing 2.0% for the white population. The disparity in age-adjusted death rates between the black and white populations was greatest from 1988 through 1996 (1.4 times greater for the black population). Since 1996, the disparity between the two populations has narrowed, as the age-adjusted rate for the black population declined 27.0% while the rate for the white population declined 15.9% (Table 1 and Figure 2). In 2013, age-adjusted death rates did not change significantly for major race and sex groups compared with 2012 (Tables A and 1). In general, age-adjusted death rates declined from 1980 through 2013 for white males and females and for black males and females. The rate decreased an average of 1.3% per year for white males, 0.7% for white females, 1.4% for black males, and 1.1% for black females during 1980–2013 (Table 1). Rates for the American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) and Asian or Pacific Islander (API) populations should be interpreted with caution because of reporting problems regarding correct identification of race on both the death certificate and in population censuses and surveys (13). Counts of deaths for the AIAN population are substantially underreported (by about 30%) on the death certificate relative to selfreporting while alive (13). Thus, the age-adjusted death rates that are shown for the AIAN population (e.g., Tables 1 and 16) do not lend themselves to valid comparisons against other races. Year-to-year trends for the AIAN population present valid insight into changes in mortality affecting this group, if it is reasonable to assume that the level of underreporting of AIAN deaths has remained more or less constant over past years (13). The age-adjusted death rate for the AIAN population fluctuated from 1980 through 1999, peaking in 1993 at 796.4 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population (Table 1). Since 1999, the rate has trended downward, declining 24.2% from 1999 to 2013. The rate for the AIAN population decreased 0.6% from 2012 (595.3) to 2013 (591.7), although the change was not significant (Table A). In 2013, the age-adjusted death rate for the API population was 405.4 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population. The level of underreporting of deaths for the API population (about 7%) is not as high as for the AIAN population (13), but this underreporting still creates enough of a challenge that any comparisons of this population with other races must be interpreted with caution. The age-adjusted death rate for the API population peaked at 586.5 in 1985. The rate fluctuated from 1985 through 1993 before starting a persistent downward trend, decreasing 28.3% from 1993 to 2013 (Table 1). Hispanic origin—Problems of race and Hispanic-origin reporting affect Hispanic death rates and the comparison of rates for the Hispanic and non-Hispanic populations; see Technical Notes. Mortality for Hispanics is somewhat understated because of net underreporting of Hispanic origin on the death certificate (by an estimated 5%), while the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations are not affected by problems of underreporting (13,14); see Technical Notes. Underreporting of Hispanic origin on the death certificate is relatively stable across age groups (13). The age-adjusted death rate in 2013 was 535.4 for the Hispanic population, 747.1 for the non-Hispanic white population, and 885.2 for
4 National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64 No. 2, February 16, 2016
Table A. Percentage change in death rates and age-adjusted death rates in 2013 from 2012, by age, race, and sex: United States [

Posted August 9, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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STATIONARY ENGINEER? MORE SCHOOLING THEN A BRAIN SURGEON!!!! OMG!!!   Leave a comment

 

make it a very special place for students, faculty and staff.

Berkeley is committed to hiring and developing staff who want to work in a high performing culture that supports the outstanding work of our faculty and students. In deciding whether to apply for a staff position at Berkeley, candidates are strongly encouraged to consider the alignment of the Berkeley Workplace Culture with their potential for success at http://jobs.berkeley.edu/why-berkeley.html.

Application Review Date

The First Review Date for this job is: August 3, 2017.

Departmental Overview

Residential and Student Service Programs (RSSP) is part of the Division of Student Affairs under the direction of the Associate Vice Chancellor of RSSP. RSSP provides student housing, residential life programs, self-operated dining services for undergraduate and graduate students and their families, and child care services for students, faculty, and staff; it also conducts a year-round conference business, operates eleven campus restaurants, and manages twenty-six faculty apartments. The Central Maintenance, Design, and Minor Capital Projects units provide a comprehensive group of services to all units within RSSP. These services include performing or managing all building trades and related maintenance services, performing interior design services, space planning, renovation project planning and management services, major maintenance, minor capital planning and project management for RSSP.

Responsibilities

Working as part of the skilled trades group and within the Stationary Engineer job scope, the incumbent provides primary building systems and equipment maintenance services for all RSSP facilities operations. The incumbent also, secondarily, performs dining and commercial food service equipment maintenance and repair services for RSSP dining facilities and Campus Restaurants.

Working independently, operate, diagnose, troubleshoot, and maintain large chillers, cooling towers, heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, high pressure steam plant, gas and oil fired hot water and steam boilers, humidifiers, gas turbines, electric generators, generator controls and switch gear and similar equipment.
Operate, diagnose, troubleshoot and maintain, pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, pressure reducing valves, and temperature change control systems, and similar equipment.
Operate, diagnose, and troubleshoot and repair computerized HVAC control systems and energy management systems.
Trouble shooting, diagnosing, maintaining, and repairing all types of specialized commercial food service and kitchen equipment including ovens, steamers, ranges, hoods, dish washing and handling equipment, and similar commercial food service equipment.
Performs maintenance, cleans, chemically treats, cooling towers, various types of chillers and boilers.
Troubleshoot, diagnose, repair refrigeration equipment control systems; troubleshoot, diagnose refrigeration equipment.
Repair pneumatic controls including thermostats and controllers.
Participates in the design or specification of assemblies, systems, equipment, and controls.
Works from drawings or prepares project drawings in detail showing measurements, materials, other required information using information from building blueprints, verbal instructions, and other information.
Perform planned and emergency maintenance, inspections, test operations, troubleshooting and documentation of work performed.
Responds to emergencies, work-on-call, rotating swing shift and holidays.
Executes all job assignments in a timely manner.
Acknowledges that all work is subject to inspection while in progress and upon completion.
Accountable for his or her own actions within work spaces of the University and Campus facilities.
As required, coordinates the work of other crafts.
As required, handles hazardous waste and will be responsible to safely handle, properly contain and label, and follow appropriate emergency procedures as they relate to hazardous waste materials.
Performs basic mathematical calculations related to performing projects.
Performs other duties as assigned.

Administrative/Technical

Coordinates with project managers and building inspectors.
Keep up-to-date, accurate, comprehensive project records including plans, specifications, submittals, schedules, requests, changes, approvals, and costs.
Consults lead/supervisor/or project managers and superintendents who administer requirements and standards for projects and/or modification of projects.
Supports maintenance projects and programmatic work assignments.
Uses information to track job status, job completion. Has the ability to prioritize requirements to optimize customer service.
Completes paperwork in a neat, accurate and timely manner.
Defines and describes materials, tools and/or equipment, work methods and task sequences.
Serves as liaison with clients, relaying their needs and requirements to the appropriate department or superintendent.
Works and supports shutdowns and project schedules to minimize interference with others.
Orders, procures materials and equipment; maintains records.
Understand and applies knowledge of relevant building codes and regulations.
Communicates clearly over the telephone and two-way radio.
Attends safety, technical and general meetings.

Safety And Health Awareness/Responsibilities

Performs all work in conformance with EH&S health and safety policies, OSHA and other applicable federal, state and local fire, health, safety, emergency-preparedness, pollution-prevention policies, RSSP policies and procedures and University of California’s policies and procedures, including IIPP (Safety and Health Procedures), Hazardous Materials Communications Program, Health and Safety Manual, as well as any other document authorized by the RSSP management to have bearing on employee safety and conduct.
Aware of potential hazardous operations, and takes appropriate precautions.
Immediately stops work in the event of danger to people or property.
Proceeds with work only after ensuring that appropriate safety procedures have been implemented.
Reports all accidents and/or incidents immediately to supervisor for record keeping.

Interpersonal Relations

Utilizes good judgment in interpersonal communications in situations requiring sensitivity and tact. Treats customers, co-workers, supervisors and managers with respect and courtesy.
Works in a cooperative manner with co-workers and promotes a cooperative team environment.
Has a good working relationship with a complete understanding of the roles of students, faculty, staff and other RSSP employees as clients.
Demonstrates at all times good communication skills with campus community, including students, building managers, faculty, and craft personnel.
Interacts directly with all levels of clients throughout the division in defining project requirements.
Responds to requests for service in a timely manner.
Supports and achieves organizational goals established to maintain and enhance customer satisfaction.
Reports progress or delays and refers major problems to lead or superintendent for resolution and informs customers as needed.

Required Qualifications

Successful completion of four year apprenticeship or equivalent work experience and demonstrated six years journey-level experience in the trade. Three years experience in the Stationary Engineer’s field and working knowledge of local, state, national, fire, mechanical, steamfitter codes and standards.
Experience in working independently performing troubleshooting, maintenance and operation of large chillers, heating systems, and boilers.
Thorough understanding of the operation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, pressure reducing valves, control systems, thermostats, controllers and the ability to perform repairs within industry standard labor times for these operations.
Demonstrated experience in reading and interpreting blueprints, drawings.
Demonstrated experience in preparing drawings in detail showing measurements and materials with information obtained from blueprints and verbal instructions.
Thorough understanding of materials, equipment, their characteristics and applications as used in performing stationary engineer’s work.
Thorough knowledge of all hand and power tools used in stationary engineer’s work, their proper application and operation.
Experience in using computerized energy management systems or similar computer control systems.
Fitted with a respirator and perform work properly using a respirator as required.
As required, provide direction to semi-skilled or unskilled assistants
Performs accurate material take-offs for projects, plans projects including material and equipment requirements, staffing needs, and estimate time required for completion.
Able to work safely at heights; able to gain access to work in small/tight areas and be able to gain access to work or maneuver around obstacles that requires stairs and ladders, able to safely maneuver supplies and objects up to 75 lbs; sets up and uses scaffolding and/or ladders to perform tasks above ground level.
Available for holidays, weekends, weekend on call-procedures, emergencies and shift work.
Reads information from equipment manufacturers’ manuals, service request, layout sketches, blueprints, appropriate state and local government codes, trade-specific manuals and practices, and to determine how the material or equipment should perform.
Understands preventive maintenance and its role in a comprehensive maintenance program. Assists with the development of and performs preventive maintenance work as directed.

Preferred Qualifications

Experience in performing building systems and equipment maintenance and repair in a large, institutional environment.

Salary & Benefits

Hourly Salary: $34.36

For information on the comprehensive benefits package offered by the University visit:

http://ucnet.universityofcalifornia.edu/compensation-and-benefits/index.html

How to Apply

Please submit your cover letter and resume as a single attachment when applying.

Driving Required

A valid driver’s license and DMV check for driving record is required.

Physical Exam

Employment is contingent upon passing a physical exam.

Conviction History Background

This is a designated position requiring fingerprinting and a background check due to the nature of the job responsibilities. Berkeley does hire people with conviction histories and reviews information received in the context of the job responsibilities. The University reserves the right to make employment contingent upon successful completion of the background check.

Posted July 23, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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DO YOU HAVE THE Mineral RIGHT’S?? YOU BETTER CHECK!!!   Leave a comment

 

As a property owner, if someone told you they were going to start drilling for oil on your land, you’d probably try to kick them off as a trespasser. But wait! Unless you also own the minerals under your land, that someone might have every right to start drilling.

In the United States, mineral rights can be sold or conveyed separately from property rights. As a result, owning a piece of land does not necessarily mean you also own the rights to the minerals beneath it. If you didn’t know this, you’re not alone. Many property owners do not understand mineral rights.
This article will discuss what mineral rights are, how they can be conveyed separately from the land they lie beneath, and whether you should worry about someone else owning the mineral rights under your property.

 

 

A mineral owner has the right to extract and use minerals found beneath the surface of a particular piece of land. What minerals are included depends on the terms of the specific conveyance (the document within which someone bought or sold the rights). The conveyance might include all the minerals under the land, or be limited to specified minerals.
The most commonly extracted minerals these days are natural gas, oil, and coal (although a mineral owner might also own and extract gold, silver, or other minerals). Occasionally, a mineral rights transfer also includes surface rights. If so, the mineral owner also has the right to extract minerals on the surface of the land, such as clay or gravel.

Mineral rights are automatically included as a part of the land in a property conveyance, unless and until the ownership gets separated at some point by an owner/seller. An owner can separate the mineral rights from his or her land by:
Conveying (selling or otherwise transferring) the land but retaining the mineral rights. (This is accomplished by including a statement in the deed conveying the land that reserves all rights to the minerals to the seller.)
Conveying the mineral rights and retaining the land. (In this case, the seller will issue a separate mineral deed to the purchaser of the mineral rights.)
Conveying the land to one person and the mineral rights to another.

Since a seller can convey only property that he or she owns, each sale of the land after the minerals are separated automatically includes only the land. Deeds to the land made after the first separation of the minerals will not refer to the fact that the mineral rights are not included.
This means that in most cases, you cannot determine whether you own the rights to the minerals under your land just by looking at your deed. Owners are sometimes surprised to find out someone else owns the rights to the minerals under their land.

It is typically a costly process to find out whether someone other than the landowner owns the mineral rights. And perhaps you don’t really need to find out. After all, removing underground minerals tends to involve great expense, so a mineral owner probably won’t find it worthwhile to remove the minerals unless they are valuable and abundant.
For example, if you live in an area that has not historically seen any oil or natural gas drilling, coal mining, or other mineral extractions, it’s not likely that there are many valuable minerals under your land that a mineral owner would bother to remove. It’s even likely that the mineral ownership on your land has not been separated, and that if you own the land, you own the minerals.
Additionally, U.S. laws regulating mining and mineral rights typically prohibit the mineral owner from damaging, or interfering with the use of any homes or other improvements on the land when extracting minerals. As a result, mineral owners do not typically attempt mineral extraction in highly populated areas. This means that if you live in a city, or an area with many houses on small plots of land, you probably won’t need to worry about whether or not you own the minerals under you.

READ!!!

In areas where mineral exploitation is common, whether or not you own the minerals  under your land might be a real concern. For example, if your property is in an area where oil rigs are an everyday sight, where natural gas drilling is prevalent, or where coal mining operations exist, if you don’t own the minerals under your land, the mineral owner might come calling.

A mineral owner’s rights typically include the right to use the surface of the land to access and mine the minerals owned. This might mean the mineral owner has the right to drill an oil or natural gas well, or excavate a mine on your property. The mineral owner is also commonly allowed to build roadways or other improvements necessary to facilitate the mineral extraction.
Sometimes the terms of the conveyance of the mineral rights restrict the mineral owner’s rights. For example, a mineral deed might put a time limit on how long drilling can continue, or restrict excavation to a certain depth. Additionally, to protect the land owner and the environment, state and local laws regulating mining and drilling typically contain restrictions on mineral extraction activities.

DO THIS!! The First Day!!

If a mineral owner contacts you about removing the minerals under your land, your first step should be to contact a lawyer in your area experienced in mineral law. The attorney can help you wade through this complex area of law and determine who really owns the minerals under your land (an arduous process of tracing deeds back to the original mineral reservation or conveyance). A number of owners might even own the rights to different minerals. Additionally, sometimes mineral royalties (the right to profit from the minerals) are conveyed separately from the mineral ownership rights.
If the person claiming mineral ownership has a valid ownership right, you might not be able to prevent him or her from removing the minerals. You can, however, talk with the attorney about how to minimize the removal operations’ impact on you and your land. At a minimum, the attorney can take steps to ensure that the mineral owner complies with any and all restrictions and regulations governing the mineral extraction and clean-up process.

 

Posted July 23, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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A WHOLE MONTH TEACHING ESL STUDENTS READ!!!!!!!   Leave a comment

www.homelessnessolutions.com

BY TEACHER ALVIN ON OCT 21, 2014imgT2

ENG INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE CENTER

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE
RESOURCE BOOK: PRONUNCIATION PAIRS LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING,PRONUNCIATION, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

Nickname ALVIN DAVIS
Nationality AMERICAN
Major: ESL TEACHER
Subject PRONUNCIATION
COURSE OBJECTIVES

This one month class is to learn to speak American English with a clear sounding of the words, to be able to speak to other people and have them understand what you are talking about, not slurred, or with slang.

Suggestions / Recommendations

Pronunciation Pairs: (To say the words very clearly), (To Remember to sound the words very clearly),

(To say the correct “ED” sound and the correct “S” “IZ” or “Z” sounds), (To say with the correct Intonations),

(Flow of the words together), (To put the emotions into your words), (To find the sounds that change in a word).

(To stress on words that have a different meaning), (To show excitement with some parts of speech).

Course Outline

Week 1 – Students will begin the class with a basic pronunciation test which will cover all vowel and consonant sounds as well as consonant clusters. From the students performance on this test individual vowel and consonant sounds will be identified and targeted for classroom learning. More complicated consonant combinations as well as past tense verb and plurals “S” endings will be practiced and reviewed.

Step 01: One hour of Pronunciation Pairs. Five Units per hour, will improve there pronunciation level in one week, each week will build confidence in there ability to speak and understand the new vocabulary of English.

Week 2 – Students will be introduced to word stress. As a means of teaching this students will learn syllable count, prefix and suffix pronunciation and compound word pronunciation and stress. Students will begin to learn higher aspects of American accent word stress and reduction of pronouns and modals.

Step 01: One hour of Grammar, will help the student start saying sentence patterns, this week will be the growing of Pronunciation with Vocabulary words. The American accent and word stress and reduction of pronouns will also be used to help the student understanding the forms of America stress and other country’s English.

Step 02: One Hour of Pronunciation. Continuing the Five Units per hour with now the Grammar you will start to see the students using the English outside of the classroom.

Week 3 – Students will work on English rhythm patterns to include highlighting stressed words within a sentence, thought groups and usual patterns of speech associated with pronouns, articles, contractions and prepositions. A closer look will be taken at phrasal verbs and descriptive devices such as simile and metaphor.

Step 01: Reading, Writing, listening. One hour of Reading, Writing, listening, will play a roll in the developing of the student’s interest in the English language as well as the understanding of “WHY” when a student can understand the why of English they start learning at a faster pace.

Step 02: One hour of Pronunciation. Continuing the Five Units per hour with now the Grammar, Reading, Writing, Listening, you will start to see the students using the English outside of the classroom even more then the first two weeks.

Week 4 –Students will be introduced to Intonation. Listing intonation, question/tag question and drop-rise intonation. Pitch range and expressive intonation will be covered. Blending, reduction and higher level English speaking skills useful in IELTs, TOEIC and TOEFL will be learned.

Step 01: Review, It is important for the student to review all that they have learned, and the mistakes that the teacher now can correct and get the student to remember the correct way to Speak, Read, Write, Listen and use the proper Grammar.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE

RESOURCE BOOK: BASICGRAMMAR IN USE LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE, TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Grammar is important because it is the language that makes it possible for us to talk about language. Grammar names the types of words and word groups that make up sentencesnot only in English but in any language. As human beings, we can put sentences together even as children–we can all do grammar. But to be able to talk about how sentences are built, about the types of words and word groups that make up sentences–that is knowing about grammar. And knowing about grammar offers a window into the human mind and into our amazingly complex mental capacity. People associate grammar with errors and correctness. But knowing about grammar also helps us understand what makes sentences and paragraphs clear and interesting and precise. Grammar can be part of literature discussions, when we and our students closely read the sentences in poetry and stories. And knowing about grammar means finding out that all languages and all dialects follow grammatical patterns.

GRAMMAR: To Learn English Grammar and how the differences are between learning English in it true form. The English Language has many different parts of Grammar and to understand each part it must be done one step at a time.

Suggestions / Recommendation:

Basic Grammar in Use: (To learn Grammar is a short time and to insure that the Grammar can be used in a formal and a business setting). To learn all the parts of Grammar, Present, Past, Present Perfect, Passive,

Verb Forms, Future, Modals, Imperatives, Auxiliary Verbs, Questions, Reported Speech, Pronouns, Possessives, Determiners, and Pronouns, with Adjectives and Adverbs, Prepositions, Two Word Verbs,

Conjunctions and Clauses.

Course Outline

  1. Week 1 – Students will begin the class with a basic grammar in use test. If they are a beginner then they will start at the Unit 01. AM/IS/ARE, This will start them learning the Positive and Negative with sentence structure and where to use them. (That’s=That is There’s=There is) they will do the exercises 1.1 to 1.6. Start: Unit 2. Exercises 2.1 to 2.5 (Questions) How to ask questions. Unit 3. Exercises 3.1 to 3.4 (Present Continuous) In these Exercises there are complete the sentences with a follow up with the teachers and with there homework. Writing about a small picture and using the proper Grammar, also writing about true sentences. Students will start Learning (Present Continuous Questions) this will build there Grammar at a faster pace. Unit 4 – 4.1 to 4.4 Exercises looking at the picture and write the proper questions to be asked in the conversation. Unit 5 – (Simple Present) Exercises 5.1 to 5.5 using Verbs. Asking Questions to other students and staff. Students will began learning (Simple Present Negative) Unit 6 Exercise 6.1 to 6.5 This will be writing negative sentences, study the information and write sentence with like, putting the verb in the correct form (Positive or Negative) Unit 7- 7.1 to 7.4 (Simple Present Questions) Write Questions also using the verbs. Write true short answers. Unit 8 – 8.1 to 8.3 (Present Continuous and Simple Present) using Present Continuous in the proper way of a sentence structure. Week 2 – Unit 9 using 9.1 to 9.4 Exercises Rewriting sentences with (got) (have) (do’s and don’t) Unit 10 is using Was/Were will be doing (Positive) (Negative) (Questions) with short answers. Start learning the correct order of the sentence. Unit 11 (Simple Past) Exercises 11.1 to 11.2 will use simple past of the verb usage. Fill in the blanks with the proper verb and Simple Past forms. Unit 12 (Simple Past Negative and Questions) Exercise 12.1 to 12.5 Complete the sentences with the proper past tense words putting the verb in the correct form. Week 3 – Unit 13 (Past Continuous) Exercises 13.1 to 13.4 looking at the picture and fill in the blanks. What did the student do? In past continuous form, complete the questions. Unit 14 (Past Continuous and Simple Past) Unit 15 (I Used to ) Unit 16 (present Perfect) Unit 17 (Simple Present and Present Perfect) Unit 18 (For, Since, Ago) Unit 19 (I Have Done and I Did). Week 4 – Unit 20 (Just, Already, and Yet) Unit 21 (I’ve Lost My Key,) Unit 22 (Passive) Unit 23 (Is Being Done) Unit 24 (Be, Have, do, in Present and Past) Unit 25 (Regular and Irregular Verbs) Unit 26 (What Are You Doing?) Unit 27 (I’m Going To) Unit 28 (Will) Unit 29 (I’ll, Will) Unit 30 (Might) Unit 31 (Can and Could) Unit 32 (Must)
  2. This is where we will start the review. The review is very important to show what the student has really learned. There will be a Grammar test to show how much the student has learned.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: WRITING LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

MORE STEPS TO WRITTING: To Learn English Writing and how the differences are between learning English in it true form. The English Language has many different parts of Writing and to understand each part it must be done one step at a time.

Suggestions / Recommendation:

More Steps to Writing: To establish writing skill’s for Business, a Contract, a E-Mail, just about anything you will need the ability to write in some form or another. Even though we live in a computer age there are still many things that need to be written or typed correctly.

Week 1- Unit 01 (Sports) Descriptive Composition Unit 02 (Entertainment) Informal Letter Unit 03 (Relationships) Discursive Composition

WeeK 2- Unit 04 (Emergencies) Short Story Unit 05 (Travel) Letter to a friend Unit 06 (Health and Fitness) Report Writing

Week 3- Unit 07 (Employment) Article Unit 08 (City and Country life) Discursive Composition

Week 4- Review, make sure of all the spelling of each thing that is done, Grammar, and content will be the best for the student to learn how to write a good report, letter, e-mail.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE

RESOURCE BOOK: EnglishVOCABULARY in Use LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, ESL TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: To teach the student a group of vocabulary words and how to use them in a sentence with the proper Grammar, and to understand the definition of vocabulary words and how to use them in different ways. English has a vast way of using the vocabulary words, so by teaching them how to use them in different situations will increase the ability to use them correctly.

Book: English Vocabulary in Use:

(Everyday Verbs) (Words and Grammar) (People) (The World) (At Home) (School and Workplace) (Leisure) (Social Issues)

Week 1: Everyday Verbs, Using language Words, Talking About Language, Learning Vocabulary, Learn words in Family, Picture and Diagrams, Exercises, 2.1 to 9.5

Week 2: (Bring) (Get) (Phrasal Verbs) (Everyday Things) (Talking) (Moving) (Conjunctions) (Time Words) (Places) Exercises, 10.1 to 18.5

Week 3: (Manner) (Irregular Verbs) (Common Uncountable Words) (Common Adjective Good and Bad) (Words and Prepositions) (Prefixes) Exercises, 19.1 to 25.6

Week 4: Review Exercises 2.1 to 25.6, Test, and correct the mistakes the student are making.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Intro provides numerous opportunities for high beginning students to actively learn contemporary American English expressions. This text is also appropriate for vocabulary courses. – Expressions are presented in interesting contexts — i.e., speaking on a car phone, being afraid to talk in school — and are spiralled through natural dialogues and listening activities. – Learning strategies, such as vocabulary indexing and clustering, focus students on becoming independent learners. – Activities include games, cartoons, role-plays, surveys, and dictations, as well as listening and writing activities that appeal to a wide range of learning styles.

SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION:

The SLE (Speaking, Listening, Expression) program is a conversation program for adult and young adult learners of English as a foreign language. It aims to improve learners’ communicative competence through an emphasis on interaction. It enables learners to acquire and practice using important functions and expressions in natural contexts while, at the same time, stimulating conversation related to various topics and real-life situations. It utilizes a number of communicative approaches to language learning in order to facilitate the learners’ timely and effective acquisition of English. The aim of the program is to improve learners’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills as well as their vocabulary and grammar skills. The SLE series provides learners with the tools they need to use their newly acquired language skills in the real world. It aims to help build learners’ confidence in using English outside the classroom by increasing their understanding of and involvement in the learning process. Most importantly, the SLE series will challenge learners and help them believe in themselves. All learners participating in the SLE program will be able take the Pagoda motto to heart. Week 1: (Nice to Meet You) (What’s your Favorite?) (Time is on my Side) (What are you doing Nowadays?) (Weather and Seasons) (Red Letter Day) (There’s still a lot Left)

Week 2: (All in the Family) (The Future is Bright) What Happened?) (I can Do It!) (Nice Suit) (Not Just Another Pretty Face) (Learning the Ins and Outs) (Wild Kingdom)

Week 3: (Would You Rather?) (Growing Up) (That Sounds Fine) (Give Me One good Reason) (Home is Where the Heart is)

Week 4: Review, Test, and correct the mistakes from each Unit, make sure there is no questions that are not answered.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: READING ADVANTAGE LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: what a language objective is

  • steps that teachers can take to create language objectives
  • how to implement language objectives in a general education classroom
  • how to align objectives to content and language standards
  • articulate for learners the academic language functions and skills that they need to master to fully participate in the lesson and meet the grade-level content standards.
  • are beneficial not only for language learners but for all students in a class, as everyone can benefit from the clarity that comes with a teacher outlining the requisite academic language to be learned and mastered in each lesson.

Week 1: (Reading Comprehension) (Idioms) (Vocabulary Reinforcement) (Target Vocabulary) (What do you Think?) (Video Jockeys) (Coffee Culture) (Around the World)

Week 2: Review last week progress and (Test) (The Puffer Fish) (Getting Married) (Say It with Flowers) (Bollywood) (The Nobel Prize)

Week 3: Review last week progress and (Test) (A Funny Cure) (Palm Reading) (Amazing Memory) (Incredible Dogs) (Diamonds)

Week 4: Review last week progress and (Test) (Space Explorers) (Happy New Year) (Text Messaging) (Urban Legends)

08:00 to 08:50: Pronunciation Pairs

09:00 to 09:50:Basic Grammar in Use

10:00 to 10:50: More Steps to Writing

11:00 to 11:50: EnglishVOCABULARY in Use

12:00 to 13:00: Lunch

13:00 to 13:50: SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION

14:00 to 14:50: READING ADVANTAGE

15:00 to 16:50: Optional Classes (POP) (MOVIES) (SURVIVAL) (PATTERN) (CNN) (BUSINESS) (PRESENTATION)

Posted October 22, 2014 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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A fate worse than death   Leave a comment

A fate worse than death

Meaning

Any misfortune that would make life unlivable, especially rape or loss of virginity. The phrase was formally a euphemism for rape.

Origin

This phrase originally attested to the belief that a dishonoured woman was better off dead. It is still used, but ironically of late. The earlier view was expressed in Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 1781:

“The matrons and virgins of Rome were exposed to injuries more dreadful, in the apprehension of chastity, than death itself.”

The current version of the phrase was used in several works from 1810 onward but was probably brought into public use via Edgar Rice Burroughs’ widely read Tarzan of the Apes, 1914:

“[The ape] threw her roughly across his broad, hairy shoulders, and leaped back into the trees, bearing Jane Porter away toward a fate a thousand times worse than death.”

 

Posted January 11, 2014 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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Start learning English   Leave a comment

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Learning the basics of the English language

Start learning English with the list of basic English lessons by clicking on this link. The list is for people that have little or no experience of the English language. The list can also be used by those that might want to refresh their knowledge on some of the English basics. The lessons are in no particular order, so pick you can choose which lesson you would like to start learning from the list available after clicking on the link.

Learning English level 1 basicLearning English – basic English lessons learn English on-line

Learning English level 1 has over seventy lessons to choose from. You can start learning this level by clicking on the link above or by clicking on the menu at the top and clicking all lessons. Basic English level one it is for people with little or have no experience of the English language or want to refresh their English. The first lesson is for learning the English alphabet and second one you will learn about numbers. The rest of the basic English level 1 lessons, you will be able to start learning some basic English words, how to greet people, jobs, food computers and much more. If you don’t see a lesson of your choice you can request a lesson by leaving a comment in the contact us in the menu.

Learning English level 2 basic

The next level is learning basic English level 2 which you will find is slightly more difficult than basic English level 1. There are a wide range of topics such as money, greetings, seasons and the months of the year are covered in depth for you to start learning at an Easy Pace Learning. Remember if you find that you are struggling with any lesson or have a question, post a message on the Easy Pace Learning forum, we will always try and help you and answer all your questions as soon as possible.

Learning English level 3 basic

Learning English level 3 is quite a hard level, but if you have completed the English lessons in level 1 and level 2 already, you might not not notice a big difference. Sometimes if you don’t understand something about the English lesson you are currently doing try repeating the lesson again, and if you are still unsure please post a question on the forum and we will help you.

Learning English level 3 learning grammar

This level you will be learning all about English grammar, we recommend that you do each lesson one after another. Whilst you are reading and studying each lesson, try to think about the explanation that is given. Do not worry too much or get obsessed about English grammar as it is only a small part of the English language, above all it is important that you enjoy learning the English language.

English vocabulary exercises

There are currently 3 levels of exercises for you to choose from. We have basic level, level 1 and level 2 exercises. There are many topics that have been covered with each having several exercises for each topic. This part of the website is the latest addition so we are currently adding exercises to the website on a daily basis.

learning basic EnglishWhat if I am struggling learning English?

When trying to learn the English language you will sometimes come into difficulties, please don’t worry as we help you as much as we can. Below is a list of questions you that might help you.

You don’t have the lesson that I want to learn about, what can I do?

Easy Pace Learning try and make as many different lessons to help make learning English as easy as possible for you to learn English, of you don’t see a English lesson we will make one for you (see next Question).

Can I request a lesson?

Yes, if there is a subject or lesson you want to learn and you can’t see the English lesson listed then ether using the contact us form or use the forum to request the lesson of your choice. We promise that we will add the lesson to the list, usually within one week. Remember Easy Pace Learning is a free on-line website built to people learning the English language.

How Easy Pace Learning will always try and help you improve learning English

If you are struggling learning English or have a question or a problem with a lesson, then try posting a question on the Easy Pace Learning forum you will not only be helping yourself, but others as well as others might be having the same problem as you. The can use the forum to ask any questions you may have about any of the lessons, it doesn’t matter if the questions is not related to a lesson as long as it is about learning English, we will answer all post as fast we can.

You can post questions on Facebook

learning basic English and having fun

Sometimes it is easier to post a question on Facebook as we all use it! to post a question on Facebook click on the link Easy Pace Learning Facebook. Then come and say hello and post as many questions as you like, just make sure you like the page as well and tell your friends.

Having fun whilst learning English

Whist you are learning English, it is important that you enjoy learning. A great way to learn English is to listening to music it will help you learn different words and are fun to listen to. Please don’t think that you have to remember all the words that you hear, use music to get used to hearing new words and also learning some.

What is Easy Pace Learning chat and will it help me learning English?

Easy Pace Learning chat feature is like Facebook, but without all the adverts or people asking you to play games. It is also a great way to practice your English that you have learnt. Sign up and get as many friends to join today and practice your English skills.

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The E& G Language Center in Davao

Advanced academic concentration through man to man class classified into different parts (4 hours a day)

Specialization of speaking class which improves confidence when talking to English speakers

Forms an atmosphere for the students to concentrate on academics through Spartan management

Philippines’ best natural environment allows people to relax while studying

E & G Courses

1

All classes are divided into different
courses according to the students’ length
of study term (8, 12, 16, 24 weeks). Each
course is divided into 5 levels and one can
take 4 hours of man-to-man class and
4 hours of group (1:4) class among these
choices: Survival English, Pronunciation,

Pop, Business English, Vocabulary &Idioms,

Pattern English, CNN, Movie, Essential
Grammar, and Topic discussion. A total of
8 hours is offered as regular study time.

linkedin wordpress youtube

 

 

Posted August 25, 2013 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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Teaching English as aSecond Language   Leave a comment

 

Come to the Philippines and Learn English Well 

E & G International Language Center was founded on June 26, 2006. Its humble beginnings were braved by six teachers and five students. Since then, that number had grown sporadically. E & G is basically an ESL (English as a Secondary Language) school in Davao City. Its students originate mainly from South Korea and Japan. The students are taught the basics and dynamics of the English language. The school provides air-conditioned dormitory rooms, a dining hall which serves three square meals a day, numerous cubicles for both single and group classes, laundry services, room cleaning services, round-the-clock wifi service, competent office staff, a 24-hour CCTV system and security guard service. Despite the proliferation of various language centers around the country, E & G is an excellent choice by many prospective students. They are especially delighted about the breath-taking location of the school besides the sea fronting infamous Samal Island. The school is comfortably located nearby several huge malls and entertainment centers that provides relaxation for the students whenever they want to unwind. The locality is sprinkled with fast food and take-out counters as well as convenient outlets for immediate needs. The future goal of the school is to be able to bring in more students from South Korea and Japan and provide them with updated English teaching programs and bring it to a level of world-class compatibility.
Things You Will Learn From E & G International Language Center
Part 1 Picture Identification
You should always look closely at each photo and ask yourself:
Who is in the photo?
What objects are visible?
Where was the photo taken?
What are the professions of the people?
What actions are being performed?
What are the positions of the people and the objects?
Part 2 Question/Response
You will hear different types of questions. Determine what type of question is being asked and what the purpose of the question is. Some questions ask for information but others may be invitations, suggestions or comments.
Listen carefully to the beginning of the question, especially for question words such as who, what, where, when, how, how much, how many, etc.
Do not expect the answer to a question to contain the same verb and tense as the question.
Part 3 Reading Comprehension
Be familiar with the layout of common types of texts such as emails, memos or formal letters in order to facilitate your reading.
Read the title and the first line of the text to determine what kind of text it is and identify the main idea.
Remember that an answer may require that you understand information in different parts of the text.
Read both documents in order to understand the relationship between the two for the sections that feature double passages.
Remember that some questions will require you to cross-check information between the two documents. You should therefore allow more time for double passages.
Phone: 082-234-6839
Homepage: http://www.engdavao.com/
Total Employees: 36
Primary Line of Business: Language Center for English Management
Directory: Hanfil P. Kim, Chairman
President Kang Wook Park
Vice-president Jocelyn R. Esplaguerra
Corporate Secretary Joanne R. Mendez
Treasurer Alma O. Quilaton
Members: Bernardo P. Solon, Jonard Garino, Hoon Huh, Sora R. Kwak,
Geographical Market: South Korea, Japan

Posted August 21, 2013 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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