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IN A “NUTSHELL” 2.5 MILLION PEOPLE “DIE” IN AMERICA PER YEAR!!!   Leave a comment

National Vital Statistics Report

February 16, 2016
Deaths: Final Data for 2013

Objectives—This report presents final 2013 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Methods—Information reported on death certificates, which are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Results—In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, a record low figure, but the decrease in 2013 from 2012 was not statistically significant. Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years, the same as in 2012. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2013 from 2012 for age groups 15–24 and 75–84. Age-specific death rates increased only for age group 55–64. The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 remained the same as in 2012, although Accidents (unintentional injuries), the 5th leading cause of death in 2012, became the 4th leading cause in 2013, while Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), the 4th leading cause in 2012, became the 5th leading cause of death in 2013. The infant mortality rate of 5.96 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2013 was a historically low value, but it was not significantly different from the 2012 rate. Conclusions—Although statistically unchanged from 2012, the decline in the age-adjusted death rate is consistent with long-term trends in mortality. Life expectancy in 2013 remained the same as in 2012. Keywords: mortality • cause of death • life expectancy • vital
statistics

Highlights
Mortality experience in 2013
• In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States. • The age-adjusted death rate, which accounts for the aging of the population, was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population. • Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years. • The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 were: 1. Diseases of heart (heart disease) 2. Malignant neoplasms (cancer) 3. Chronic lower respiratory diseases 4. Accidents (unintentional injuries) 5. Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke) 6. Alzheimer’s disease 7. Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) 8. Influenza and pneumonia 9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (kidney disease) 10. Intentional self-harm (suicide) 11. Septicemia 12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis 13. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (hypertension) 14. Parkinson’s disease 15. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids • In 2013, the infant mortality rate was 5.96 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. • The 10 leading causes of infant death were: 1. Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (congenital malformations) 2. Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified (low birth weight)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Health Statistics
National Vital Statistics System

2 National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64 No. 2, February 16, 2016
3. Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy (maternal complications) 4. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) 5. Accidents (unintentional injuries) 6. Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes (cord and placental complications) 7. Bacterial sepsis of newborn 8. Respiratory distress of newborn 9. Diseases of the circulatory system 10. Neonatal hemorrhage
Trends • The age-adjusted death rate declined to a record low in 2013, although the decrease from 2012 to 2013 was not significant. • Life expectancy for the total population was 78.8 years in 2013, the same as in 2012. • Life expectancy did not change for any of the major race and ethnicity populations from 2012 to 2013. • Life expectancy for females was 4.8 years higher than for males. The difference in life expectancy between the sexes has narrowed since 1979, when it was 7.8 years, but it has remained at 4.8 years since 2010. • The 15 leading causes of death were the same in 2013 as they were in 2012, although unintentional injuries and stroke exchanged positions in the ranking. • Age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly in 2013 from 2012 for 4 of the 15 leading causes of death and increased for 6 of the 15 leading causes. • Rates for the two leading causes—heart disease and cancer— continued their long-term decreasing trends. Significant decreases also occurred for stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. Significant increases occurred in 2013 from 2012 for Chronic lower respiratory diseases, Influenza and pneumonia, Septicemia, Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, hypertension, and Parkinson’s disease. • Within external causes of injury death, unintentional poisoning was the leading mechanism of injury mortality in 2013, followed by unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries. During 2002–2010, unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries was the leading mechanism of injury mortality, followed by unintentional poisoning, but beginning in 2011, the number of deaths from unintentional poisoning was higher than the number from unintentional motor vehicle traffic-related injuries; see CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) at http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html. • Differences in mortality between the non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white populations persisted. The age-adjusted death rate was 1.2 times greater for the non-Hispanic black population than for the non-Hispanic white population. • The differences in life expectancy among the Hispanic, nonHispanic white, and non-Hispanic black populations in 2013 were the same as in 2012. The difference in life expectancy between the non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white populations was 3.8 years, between the non-Hispanic black and Hispanic populations was 6.5 years, and between the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations was 2.7 years.
• The infant mortality rate declined 0.3% in 2013 from 2012, to a record low of 5.96 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, but the decline was not statistically significant. Introduction This report presents detailed 2013 data on deaths and death rates according to a number of demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among residents of the United States by such variables as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Information on these mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and wellbeing of the U.S. population (1). Separate companion reports present additional details on leading causes of death and life expectancy in the United States (2,3). Mortality data in this report can be used to monitor and evaluate the health status of the United States in terms of current mortality levels and long-term mortality trends, as well as to identify segments of the U.S. population at greater risk of death from specific diseases and injuries. Differences in death rates among various demographic subpopulations, including race and ethnicity groups, may reflect subpopulation differences in factors such as socioeconomic status, access to medical care, and the prevalence of specific risk factors in a particular subpopulation. Methods Data in this report are based on information from all resident death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 99% of deaths occurring in this country are believed to be registered (4). Tables showing data by state also provide information for Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Northern Marianas). Cause-of-death statistics presented in this report are classified in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10) (5). A discussion of the cause-of-death classification is provided in Technical Notes at the end of the report. Mortality data on specific demographic and medical characteristics cover all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Measures of mortality in this report include the number of deaths; crude, agespecific, and age-adjusted death rates; infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates; life expectancy; and rate ratios. Changes in death rates in 2013 compared with 2012, and differences in death rates across demographic groups in 2013, are tested for statistical significance. Unless otherwise specified, reported differences are statistically significant. Additional information on these statistical methods, random variation and relative standard error, the computation of derived statistics and rates, population denominators, and the definition of terms is presented in Technical Notes. The populations used to calculate death rates shown in this report for 1991–2013 were produced under a collaborative arrangement with the U.S. Census Bureau. Populations for 2010–2013 and the intercensal period 2001–2009 are consistent with the 2010 census (6–10). Reflecting the latest guidelines issued in 1997 by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the 2000 and 2010 censuses included an option for persons to report more than one race as appropriate for themselves and household members (11); see Technical Notes for
3 National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64 No. 2, February 16, 2016
detailed information on the 2013 multiple-race reporting area and methods used to bridge responses for those who report more than one race. Beginning with deaths occurring in 2003, some states allowed for multiple-race reporting on the death certificate. Multiple-race data for these states are bridged to single-race categories; see Technical Notes. Once all states are collecting data on race according to the 1997 OMB guidelines, use of the bridged-race algorithm is expected to be discontinued. The population data used to compile death rates by race in this report are based on special estimation procedures and are not true counts (see Technical Notes, ‘‘Race and Hispanic origin’’). This is the case even for the 2000 and 2010 populations. The estimation procedures used to develop these populations contain some error. Smaller population groups are affected much more than larger population groups (12). Data presented in this report and other mortality tabulations are available from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) website, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm. Availability of mortality microdata is described in Technical Notes.
Results and Discussion
Deaths and death rates In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States—53,714 more deaths than in 2012. The crude death rate for 2013 (821.5 deaths per 100,000 population) was 1.4% higher than the 2012 rate (810.2) (Tables A, 1, 3, 4, 14, and 15). The age-adjusted death rate in 2013 was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population—a record low value, although it was notsignificantlydifferentfrom2012(Table 1).Age-adjusteddeathrates are constructs that show what the level of mortality would be if no changes occurred in the age composition of the population from year to year. (For a discussion of age-adjusted death rates, see Technical Notes.) Thus, age-adjusted death rates are better indicators than unadjusted (crude) death rates for examining changes in the risk of death over a period of time when the age distribution of the population is changing. Age-adjusted death rates also are better indicators of relative risk when comparing mortality across geographic areas or between sex or race subgroups of the population that have different age distributions; see Technical Notes. Since 1980, the age-adjusted death rate has decreased significantly every year except 1983, 1985, 1988, 1993, 1999, 2005, 2008, and 2013 (Figure 1 and Table 1). Race—In 2013, age-adjusted death rates for the major race groups (Table 1) were: • White population: 731.0 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population • Black population: 860.8 In 2013, the age-adjusted death rate for the black population was 1.2 times that for the white population (Table B). The average risk of death for the black population was 17.8% higher than for the white population (Table 1). From 1960 through 1982, rates for the black and white populations declined by similar percentages (22.6% and 26.5%, respectively). From 1983 through 1988, rates diverged,
increasing 3.5% for the black population and decreasing 2.0% for the white population. The disparity in age-adjusted death rates between the black and white populations was greatest from 1988 through 1996 (1.4 times greater for the black population). Since 1996, the disparity between the two populations has narrowed, as the age-adjusted rate for the black population declined 27.0% while the rate for the white population declined 15.9% (Table 1 and Figure 2). In 2013, age-adjusted death rates did not change significantly for major race and sex groups compared with 2012 (Tables A and 1). In general, age-adjusted death rates declined from 1980 through 2013 for white males and females and for black males and females. The rate decreased an average of 1.3% per year for white males, 0.7% for white females, 1.4% for black males, and 1.1% for black females during 1980–2013 (Table 1). Rates for the American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) and Asian or Pacific Islander (API) populations should be interpreted with caution because of reporting problems regarding correct identification of race on both the death certificate and in population censuses and surveys (13). Counts of deaths for the AIAN population are substantially underreported (by about 30%) on the death certificate relative to selfreporting while alive (13). Thus, the age-adjusted death rates that are shown for the AIAN population (e.g., Tables 1 and 16) do not lend themselves to valid comparisons against other races. Year-to-year trends for the AIAN population present valid insight into changes in mortality affecting this group, if it is reasonable to assume that the level of underreporting of AIAN deaths has remained more or less constant over past years (13). The age-adjusted death rate for the AIAN population fluctuated from 1980 through 1999, peaking in 1993 at 796.4 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population (Table 1). Since 1999, the rate has trended downward, declining 24.2% from 1999 to 2013. The rate for the AIAN population decreased 0.6% from 2012 (595.3) to 2013 (591.7), although the change was not significant (Table A). In 2013, the age-adjusted death rate for the API population was 405.4 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population. The level of underreporting of deaths for the API population (about 7%) is not as high as for the AIAN population (13), but this underreporting still creates enough of a challenge that any comparisons of this population with other races must be interpreted with caution. The age-adjusted death rate for the API population peaked at 586.5 in 1985. The rate fluctuated from 1985 through 1993 before starting a persistent downward trend, decreasing 28.3% from 1993 to 2013 (Table 1). Hispanic origin—Problems of race and Hispanic-origin reporting affect Hispanic death rates and the comparison of rates for the Hispanic and non-Hispanic populations; see Technical Notes. Mortality for Hispanics is somewhat understated because of net underreporting of Hispanic origin on the death certificate (by an estimated 5%), while the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations are not affected by problems of underreporting (13,14); see Technical Notes. Underreporting of Hispanic origin on the death certificate is relatively stable across age groups (13). The age-adjusted death rate in 2013 was 535.4 for the Hispanic population, 747.1 for the non-Hispanic white population, and 885.2 for
4 National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 64 No. 2, February 16, 2016
Table A. Percentage change in death rates and age-adjusted death rates in 2013 from 2012, by age, race, and sex: United States [

Posted August 9, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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DO YOU HAVE THE Mineral RIGHT’S?? YOU BETTER CHECK!!!   Leave a comment

 

As a property owner, if someone told you they were going to start drilling for oil on your land, you’d probably try to kick them off as a trespasser. But wait! Unless you also own the minerals under your land, that someone might have every right to start drilling.

In the United States, mineral rights can be sold or conveyed separately from property rights. As a result, owning a piece of land does not necessarily mean you also own the rights to the minerals beneath it. If you didn’t know this, you’re not alone. Many property owners do not understand mineral rights.
This article will discuss what mineral rights are, how they can be conveyed separately from the land they lie beneath, and whether you should worry about someone else owning the mineral rights under your property.

 

 

A mineral owner has the right to extract and use minerals found beneath the surface of a particular piece of land. What minerals are included depends on the terms of the specific conveyance (the document within which someone bought or sold the rights). The conveyance might include all the minerals under the land, or be limited to specified minerals.
The most commonly extracted minerals these days are natural gas, oil, and coal (although a mineral owner might also own and extract gold, silver, or other minerals). Occasionally, a mineral rights transfer also includes surface rights. If so, the mineral owner also has the right to extract minerals on the surface of the land, such as clay or gravel.

Mineral rights are automatically included as a part of the land in a property conveyance, unless and until the ownership gets separated at some point by an owner/seller. An owner can separate the mineral rights from his or her land by:
Conveying (selling or otherwise transferring) the land but retaining the mineral rights. (This is accomplished by including a statement in the deed conveying the land that reserves all rights to the minerals to the seller.)
Conveying the mineral rights and retaining the land. (In this case, the seller will issue a separate mineral deed to the purchaser of the mineral rights.)
Conveying the land to one person and the mineral rights to another.

Since a seller can convey only property that he or she owns, each sale of the land after the minerals are separated automatically includes only the land. Deeds to the land made after the first separation of the minerals will not refer to the fact that the mineral rights are not included.
This means that in most cases, you cannot determine whether you own the rights to the minerals under your land just by looking at your deed. Owners are sometimes surprised to find out someone else owns the rights to the minerals under their land.

It is typically a costly process to find out whether someone other than the landowner owns the mineral rights. And perhaps you don’t really need to find out. After all, removing underground minerals tends to involve great expense, so a mineral owner probably won’t find it worthwhile to remove the minerals unless they are valuable and abundant.
For example, if you live in an area that has not historically seen any oil or natural gas drilling, coal mining, or other mineral extractions, it’s not likely that there are many valuable minerals under your land that a mineral owner would bother to remove. It’s even likely that the mineral ownership on your land has not been separated, and that if you own the land, you own the minerals.
Additionally, U.S. laws regulating mining and mineral rights typically prohibit the mineral owner from damaging, or interfering with the use of any homes or other improvements on the land when extracting minerals. As a result, mineral owners do not typically attempt mineral extraction in highly populated areas. This means that if you live in a city, or an area with many houses on small plots of land, you probably won’t need to worry about whether or not you own the minerals under you.

READ!!!

In areas where mineral exploitation is common, whether or not you own the minerals  under your land might be a real concern. For example, if your property is in an area where oil rigs are an everyday sight, where natural gas drilling is prevalent, or where coal mining operations exist, if you don’t own the minerals under your land, the mineral owner might come calling.

A mineral owner’s rights typically include the right to use the surface of the land to access and mine the minerals owned. This might mean the mineral owner has the right to drill an oil or natural gas well, or excavate a mine on your property. The mineral owner is also commonly allowed to build roadways or other improvements necessary to facilitate the mineral extraction.
Sometimes the terms of the conveyance of the mineral rights restrict the mineral owner’s rights. For example, a mineral deed might put a time limit on how long drilling can continue, or restrict excavation to a certain depth. Additionally, to protect the land owner and the environment, state and local laws regulating mining and drilling typically contain restrictions on mineral extraction activities.

DO THIS!! The First Day!!

If a mineral owner contacts you about removing the minerals under your land, your first step should be to contact a lawyer in your area experienced in mineral law. The attorney can help you wade through this complex area of law and determine who really owns the minerals under your land (an arduous process of tracing deeds back to the original mineral reservation or conveyance). A number of owners might even own the rights to different minerals. Additionally, sometimes mineral royalties (the right to profit from the minerals) are conveyed separately from the mineral ownership rights.
If the person claiming mineral ownership has a valid ownership right, you might not be able to prevent him or her from removing the minerals. You can, however, talk with the attorney about how to minimize the removal operations’ impact on you and your land. At a minimum, the attorney can take steps to ensure that the mineral owner complies with any and all restrictions and regulations governing the mineral extraction and clean-up process.

 

Posted July 23, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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Property Taxes: Legally being applied, or not? “NO”   Leave a comment

 

Property Taxes: Legally being applied, or not?
The issue of real and personal property taxation is long overdue to be challenged. The premise is that for a personal property tax on a free sovereign, private individual to be legal, it must be Constitutional, and applied as the Constitution regulates it. Any other means makes the tax void in law.
All citizens have the right to know why they are being taxed, and to know that it is a legal taxation which represents their interests. Paying taxes without knowing the law and your rights makes you nothing more than a slave.
How many people do you know of or have heard about that have lost their property… home or land, because of not paying property taxes? It occurs across the country on a daily basis. This is not only immoral and unethical, it is criminal and a violation of a person’s civil rights. WHY?
Most every sale of property occurs without ANY Due Process… that is, there has been no court hearing, no judgment, no adjudication of all facts, and no consideration given for the actual laws regarding the tax in the first place. That is where this information come in. You now have a means to not only challenge your property taxes, but to have any lost property returned to you via the courts for violation of your rights and the law, to include damages.
NOTICE:
It is a crime for any government office or any official to auction or otherwise sell in any way, private or business property of any individual WITHOUT FIRST HAVING DUE PROCESS OF LAW, to determine the cause of action and the recourse in law. The sale of any property outside this means is illegal, and all those involved with such a sale, including those purchasing said property, are personally liable for damages, and subject to criminal charges under Racketeering (RICO) laws, and for violation of civil and Due Process rights. All government officials have the “Greater Duty” to know the law and comply with it, and if you are involved with such an auction without Due Process for the owner, you are in breach of your fiduciary duty and you can be held personally liable by those harmed by this fraud. Any challenge to property taxation or property sale made by any citizen requires you to respond, point by point, and to “prove up” your position in law.
For you to understand WHY property taxes as applied are unconstitutional, you need the facts of law. The following Property Tax Challenge Document provides you the laws you need to understand and use to make your case. Be sure to read it through completely. Use it to request from your assessor, the actual authority they have to tax your personal property as they are. Customize it to your personal and state situation, have it Notarized, and send it certified mail, return receipt requested. If they refuse to answer it within 30 days, stop paying your property taxes and use the document as your evidence of good faith efforts to receive proof of the laws. It is also good to CC your State Attorney General, and your Senator and Congressmen, your County Commissioners and perhaps the sheriff. This places them on NOTICE as well, and can be used as more proof of your “good faith” efforts to determine your true liability for property taxes. Keep in mind that you will most likely have to defend yourself against their likely criminal response, but you can do it with this material. If you must, pay the taxes, but be sure to do so with a statement on the check or certified money order to the affect: “Paid under duress and coercion.”
You can also use a form of this to challenge taxes paid on an old piece of property since fraud has no statute of limitations, and damages can be recouped for this fraud. Simply change the verbiage to be asking about past taxes you paid… DON’T TAKE THIS FRAUD LYING DOWN!!!
If you are unsure about this, have your attorney review this document and the laws it references. If he cannot refute the premise, showing the laws and facts that support their position, how can a city government do so? If the attorney tries to refute it, please forward the response to us and we will provide rebuttal and further proof for you and them.
Business Property Taxes:
If you have a business that is “incorporated,” you fall under possible tax liability because to incorporate is to seek a “privilege” from the government and that privilege CAN be taxed… BUT IT MUST BE TAXED ACCORDING TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL FORMS OF TAXATION, WHICH IT NEVER IS. You can use a form of the above document to challenge these taxes as well because they do not fall under legal forms of taxes.
If you have a private business, sole proprietor or other form of private business, you are NOT subject to personal property taxes as the Constitution and laws declare. Challenging these taxes is the first step in freeing yourself from the tyranny and corruption of lawless government and officials, however well-meaning they may be. Ignorance of the law is no excuse. By requesting this information from your city officials, you are not only making sure that you are paying what you legally owe, but you are placing your government officials “ON NOTICE” that this activity could well be illegal and this requires that they personally respond, and investigate or bring to the attention of their superiors, the issue. They have the “Greater Duty” to know the law and comply with it, or they are in breach of their fiduciary duty and can be held personally liable.
This is the first step to take to challenge your property taxes. If the assessor does NOT respond, we will have the next step to take which will be a lawsuit, which is easy to file and you do NOT need an attorney for. In fact, as you begin to learn more about the actual laws and Constitution, you can easily represent yourself in most any case you have to deal with, whether bringing suit, or defending yourself. Seminars will be available in the near future to teach this.
By the way, the same legal argument exists for Income Taxes. Research this as well. You will be amazed and angered at how we have been, and are being, deceived and defrauded by government.
Legal Disclaimer

Posted July 23, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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