“MONEY HAWK’S IN AMERICA SOME DO GET CAUGHT!!!!   Leave a comment

Below you will see two group’s, one is CEO stealing money from there employee’s and the other CEO making 500,000 to 1 million dollar a year to

do service for the poor and homeless.  Some get caught, most don’t, it is a shame in America, where we are strong and can find work and support

our family’s that we have poor, and homeless, in the past 8yr homeless has tripled to a new high, and there are 33% of American’s on food stamp’s

this is higher the 1929 Depression  (DEARB GOD) “HOW CAN WE DO THIS?”

MAYBE IF E LOOK AT THE CEO’S OF AMERICA WE CAN SEE WHAT IS REALLY GOING ON !!!

 

 

 

Top 10 CEOs in Prison: Why’d They Do It?
Comment Share Tweet Stumble Email
Last Updated Jun 15, 2010 1:31 PM EDT
What do Jeff Skilling, Bernie Ebbers, Dennis Kozlowski, John Rigas, Sanjay Kumar, Walter Forbes, Joe Nacchio, Richard Scrushy, Sam Waksal, and Martin Grass all have in common? They were all CEOs of prominent public companies, convicted of big-time corporate fraud and sentenced to lengthy prison terms.
They were all also fabulously wealthy when they committed their crimes. Nevertheless, they risked their careers, families, reputation, wealth, power, everything. And for what? You’ve got to wonder, what motivates rich, high-powered CEOs to unnecessarily risk it all against all logic and ethical principals?
Perhaps their brain circuitry is somehow hard-wired for exceptional success followed by devastating disaster. Or maybe it’s just probability? Maybe x percent of highly successful, super-wealthy CEOs of big companies will turn out to be dysfunctional crooks. Not buying those explanations? Me neither. Let’s see if we can figure out …
What Motivates Rich, Powerful CEOs to Commit Fraud?
Greed. Corporate America is often characterized as the land of greed; why shouldn’t the folks at the top be the greediest of all? Actually, these CEOs risked way more wealth than they stood to gain by their fraudulent actions. I don’t think any amount of money or power would have fulfilled the needs that made them commit these acts.
Arrogance. Sam Waksal of ImClone described himself as arrogant in an interview after his conviction. Perhaps all that power and money makes CEOs feel invincible, untouchable, above the law. And maybe they got caught because, on some level, they knew what they were doing was wrong and wanted to be punished for it. Hmm.
Evil. Well, evil is sort of a philosophical concept. In this context, perhaps it describes the effect the CEO’s actions had on shareholders and employees, but I don’t think it actually describes their behavior. I mean, they didn’t torture little puppies or murder anybody.
Stupidity. Maybe they’re just plain stupid. No, I don’t think so. Most of these people didn’t just fall off the turnip truck. Look at Computer Associates, Enron, ImClone, Qwest, Tyco, WorldCom. These CEOs built huge, successful companies. I don’t buy that any of them were anything but brilliant businessmen.
Personality Disorder. Delusional, narcissistic psychopaths, call them what you want, it sounds like a no-brainer to me. I mean, most of these folks maintained their innocence to the end. That implies compartmentalization so they didn’t actually feel empathy for those affected by their actions. Denial is a powerful thing. Sure sounds like a behavioral disorder to me. Anyway, there’s no denying that each of these men functioned, and functioned exceptionally, until their issues caught up with them.
So, if it’s a behavioral disorder, that sort of begs the biggest question of all: Can you somehow identify these people before they actually commit the crime? Any thoughts on that?
In any case, here are my Top 10 CEOs in Prison:
Jeff Skilling, former CEO of Enron
Serving 24 years for fraud, insider trading, and other crimes related to the collapse of Enron
Bernie Ebbers, former CEO of WorldCom
Serving 25 years for accounting fraud that cost investors over $100 billion
Dennis Kozlowski, former CEO of Tyco Serving 8 to 25 years for stealing $134 million from Tyco
John Rigas, former CEO of Adelphia Communications Serving 25 years for bank, wire, and securities fraud related to the demise of Adelphia
Sanjay Kumar, former CEO of Computer Associates Serving 12 years for obstruction of justice and securities fraud
Walter Forbes, former CEO of Cendant Serving 12 years for fraud
Richard Scrushy, former CEO of HealthSouth Serving 7 years for bribery and mail fraud
Joseph Nacchio, former CEO of Qwest Communications
Serving 6 years for insider trading
Sam Waksal, former CEO of ImClone Served 7 years for securities fraud (released last year)
Martin Grass, former CEO of Rite Aid Served 6 years for fraud and obstruction (just released this year)

Former United Way Chief Guilty In Theft of More Than $600,000
ALEXANDRIA, Va., April 3— A Federal jury today found William Aramony, the former president of United Way of America, guilty of stealing more than $600,000 from the charity and using the money to pay for vacations, luxury apartments and other benefits for himself and his teen-age girlfriend.
The case has been an embarrassment both to the independent United Way organizations and to the charitable sector generally. United Way is one of the country’s biggest charities, raising more than $3 billion through payroll checkoff plans. United Way of America, which Mr. Aramony headed for 22 years, provided the local, independent fund-raising drives with marketing, training and other services.
Elaine Chao, who replaced Mr. Aramony as the president of United Way of America in 1992, said she and her board were gratified by the conviction. “We are glad to have this chapter behind us,” she said. “We’re focused on the future.”
Mr. Aramony faces the possibility of hundreds of thousands of dollars of fines, and a prison term. His lawyer, William Moffitt, said he would appeal the verdict.
Randy I. Bellows, the Assistant United States Attorney who prosecuted the case, said the guilty verdict demonstrated that “when an individual abuses the trust placed in him, society won’t tolerate it.”
“This verdict sends a message to anybody charged with the responsibility for protecting a charity that they will be held accountable,” he said.
The jury’s decision, in the Federal District Court for Eastern Virginia, came in the fifth week of the trial after an unexpectedly long seven days of deliberation. One juror, Alan Hannen, a driver for United Parcel Service, said the jurors had been shocked that no defense witnesses had been presented and felt “even more obligated to go through the paperwork,” as a result.
Mr. Hannen said a good deal of the jury’s time was spent figuring out how to go through the voluminous documents. The prosecution presented nearly 1,000 pieces of evidence, and the defense added several hundred more.
To speed the trial along in a court known as a “rocket docket” the judge was liberal in allowing evidence to be entered but did not allow time to be spent in describing the documents. They should speak for themselves, he said.
Mr. Hannen said the jurors had largely ignored Mr. Aramony’s history of womanizing, but he said the biggest thing on his mind as the jury deliberated was “all the money that went to Lori Villasor,” Mr. Aramony’s young girlfriend, although she did little or no work.
Mr. Moffitt asserted that no one had won a complete victory in the case. He noted that the judge had cut the charges to 46 from 71 before sending the case to the jury.
“We got scarred a little bit, but the Government got scarred a little bit, too,” Mr. Moffitt said.
Mr. Aramony, 67, appeared relaxed and chipper through the trial. He was convicted of 25 of 27 counts of conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, the filing of false income tax returns and transactions involving criminally derived property. He declined to comment.
The jury also found two of Mr. Aramony’s former aides, Thomas J. Merlo, 64, and Stephen J. Paulachak, 49, who had both served as chief financial officer of United Way of America, guilty of diverting charitable funds. It found Mr. Merlo guilty of 17 of 18 counts of conspiracy, fraud and filing of false tax returns, and Mr. Paulachak of 8 of 12 counts.
But the jury said a for-profit spinoff from United Way of America, Partnership Umbrella Inc., which the Government said the men had used as a vehicle for diverting charitable funds, was not guilty of conspiracy to commit tax fraud.
Judge Claude M. Hilton set sentencing for June 14. The maximum possible term for any single count in the case is 10 years.
While the scandal left the people who head charities uneasy, most suggested that Mr. Aramony’s case was an aberration. Many also believe that the oversight of the nonprofit sector could be strengthened. There has been growing attention to the performance of directors and whether they have the skills and time to oversee the nonprofits they are responsible for.
“This case is a lesson to all boards that no matter how much they trust the executive director and have confidence in him or her, they really must perform the oversight function and exercise due diligence,” said Eleanor Brilliant, a professor at the Rutgers University School of Social Work and author of a book about United Way. “The issue of the board’s role has been raised but not fully addressed.”
The governors of United Way of America, who included chief executives of blue chip companies like I.B.M., AT&T and Sears, were portrayed by the Government as victims in this case. The defense, however, suggested that it was they who had slipped up.
They knew exactly what Mr. Aramony was doing, but knew they would have trouble finding another leader as dynamic as he was, Mr. Moffitt said. He noted that Mr. Aramony and Ms. Villasor had stayed together in the home of one of Mr. Aramony’s directors.
As president of United Way of America from 1970 to 1992, when he resigned under pressure, Mr. Aramony had been widely considered a dynamic leader who helped to build the operation by standardizing the name and the approach and bringing valuable advertising strategies and professionalism.
At the time of his departure, United Way of America collected about $29 million in dues from the local campaigns and paid Mr. Aramony about $463,000 in salary and benefits.
When reports surfaced in 1992 that Mr. Aramony had spent money from United Way of America on vacations to London, Paris, Egypt, Las Vegas and elsewhere for himself and his young girlfriend and on apartments for their personal use in Coral Gables, Fla., and on the East Side of Manhattan, donors and volunteers expressed outrage and contributions fell.
The organization brought in Ms. Chao, pared itself down to a leaner entity and introduced stringent financial controls and ethical standards. Local United Way officials say donations are rising.
Mr. Moffitt argued that Mr. Aramony had to maintain a lavish standard of living to persuade chief executives of America’s top companies to work for United Way. He also hammered at the theme that the directors were aware of Mr. Aramony’s behavior and seemed to find it acceptable, until reports started becoming public.
Mr. Moffitt repeatedly admitted that Mr. Aramony had made mistakes in having affairs with women he employed and in “sexually harassing” them, but he said his client was not guilty of taking money meant for charity.
The jury felt otherwise.
Others outside of the courtroom found the verdict appropriate.
“Anyone who abuses the public trust and misuses contributors’ money deserves to pay a harsh penalty,” said James J. Bausch, president of the National Charities Information Bureau.

Out of 3,929 charities reviewed in Charity Navigator’s 2013 CEO Compensation Study, a whopping 78 of the CEOs mentioned reportedly earned salaries between $500,000 and $1 million. The study revealed many donors simply assume these leaders work for free or minimal pay. It’s easy to forget that these large charities are multi-million dollar operations.
Are these high-earning execs pulling a fair salary for their good works, or are their impressive salaries questionable considering the nature of their work?
Several states, including New York, New Jersey, Florida and Massachusetts, have pushed legislation to limit the salary of nonprofit CEOs who accept public funding. Florida pushed for a limit of $129,972, while Massachusetts suggested $500,000 (Forbes). New York Governor Andrew Cuomo told Forbes, “These regulations will allow the state government to identify and stop the few providers that pocket taxpayer dollars rather than use them to serve the public.”
When qualified talent is already earning less than what would be offered by a for-profit company, the issue comes down to a question of whether or not a strong corporate culture is crucial to the success of these charities. In the corporate world, a higher salary results in a greater value. While looking at CEO compensation for these charities is only one number, if their talent results in greater revenue for the organization, the level of income may be justifiable. Take a look at this list of 12 nonprofit CEOs raking in a staggering annual salary, and let us know what you think in the comments section below.

William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Laurance Hoagland Jr., Chief Investment Officer of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation earns a hefty salary of $2.5 million. The Hewlett Foundation has a wide range of goals—reducing global poverty, limiting the risk of climate change, advancing education, improving reproductive health rights and supporting local performing arts. (Huffington Post)
American Cancer Society
John Seffrin, CEO of American Cancer Society, earns $2.1 million, while also serving at the White House on the public health advisory group. The American Cancer Society is the world’s largest voluntary health organization fighting cancer. (Huffington Post)
Boys & Girls Club of America
Roxanne Spillett, President of Boys & Girls Clubs of America, earns $1.8 million at an organization with expenses exceeding $130 million (CNN Money). The Boys & Girls Club provides educational after-school programs for more than 4,000 chapters, serving around 4 million children. (Huffington Post)
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Emily K. Rafferty, President of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, earns nearly $1.5 million. The Met was founded in 1870 to encourage the study and application of fine arts. The Met’s yearly expenses have reached $386 million (CNN Money). (Charity Navigator)
Los Angeles Opera
Placido Domingo, General Director of the Los Angeles Opera earns $1.35 million. Domingo is an opera singer and conductor as well, performing in more than 3,600 shows. Domingo has won twelve Grammy’s and has played a role in three opera films. This charitable CEO played a voice role in Disney’s Beverly Hills Chihuahua. (Huffington Post)
The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts
Michael Kaiser, President of the JFK Center for Performing Arts in Washington D.C., earns $1.348 million. Kaiser previously worked for the Royal Opera House and was a corporate advisor before focusing on the arts, working for clients like GM and IBM. The Kennedy Center seeks the best performers from around the world, while striving to be a leader in arts education. (Huffington Post)
Metropolitan Opera Association
Peter Gelb, General Manager of the Metropolitan Opera Association in New York, earns $1.3 million. The Met Opera hosts more than 200 performances every year with some of the world’s most creative and talented artists worldwide. Gelb has had a lifelong love of the opera. He began working at the Met Opera at 17 years old as an usher. Now, as General Manager, Gelb earns $78K in benefits. The Met Opera is currently undergoing a drop in attendance and severe labor negotiations, discussing cuts of 17 percent their annual compensation (New York Observer). (Huffington Post)
Museum of Modern Art, New York
Glenn Lowry, Chief Executive of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, earns $1.2 million. Notably, the museum raised admission costs in 2012, while the CEO still receives $318K in housing to live free of charge in a $6 million apartment in MoMA’s residential tower. (Huffington Post)
United Way Worldwide
Brian A. Gallagher, President and CEO of United Way Worldwide, earns $1.2 million. United Way was founded in 1887 to transport leaders and support to 41 countries and territories around the world. Groups promote educational and health initiatives to suffering communities. (Charity Navigator)
J. Paul Getty Trust
James Williams, Chief Investment Officer of the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles, earns $1.2 million. The Getty, one of the world’s wealthiest art institutions, is dedicated to carefully presenting and conserving the world’s artistic legacy. After cutting back on several programs and employees and raising parking costs during the recession, Williams was able to maintain his more-than-agreeable salary. (Huffington Post)
National Jewish Health
Michael Salem, President and CEO of National Jewish Health, earns a salary of just over $1 million. National Jewish Health is the leading hospital for respiratory care in the United States. (Charity Navigator)
Goodwill
Michael Miller, CEO of Goodwill, earns $856,043. Goodwill uses donations to train people for jobs who are currently unemployed. After being ridiculed by the Oregon Department of Justice for an “unreasonable” salary, Miller continues with compensation surpassing $850,000. During Miller’s time at Goodwill, he has increased revenue up to 107 percent to a record $135.5 million, while adding 1,000 jobs since 2004. The number of people served through Goodwill has increased from 11,694 to 52,170 during Miller’s leadership, perhaps proving the benefit of well-paid charity CEOs (Portland Business Journal).

Advertisements

Posted July 17, 2017 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: