Archive for November 2015

LEARN ENGLISH WITH CAPTAIN ENGLISH   Leave a comment

take a pose

CAPTAIN ENGLISH
eslschoolforenglish.wordpress.com
homelessnessolutions.com

 

 

About TO Speak English Today

It is easy to chat with your friends in your own language, but what about speaking English? Research has shown that “interaction” is a key to developing good conversation skills. It doesn’t matter who you speak with; the experience of speaking in itself is great practice.

CAPTAIN ENGLISH
eslschoolforenglish.wordpress.com
homelessnessolutions.com is an online meeting place for English students and teachers from around the world. We will help link you to personal tutors, conversation partners, or others who want to talk in English.

Our network includes thousands of students, so you can begin practicing right away! It’s free to text and chat with other students and conversation partners. We also provide qualified instructors who are willing to help you practice your English online. You may be required to pay for their help.

 

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Posted November 25, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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NOBODY DIED AT SANDYHOOK SCHOOL “WAKE” “UP” AMERICA PEOPLE!!!!!!   Leave a comment

take a pose

 

 

 

Posted November 23, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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Please write your answers to the following hypothetical questions.   Leave a comment

BE TRUTHFULL TO THESE QUESTIONS PLEASE!!!!!!!

 (Euphemism DCT)

Gender: Male            Female

Age:

Academic Degree:

Nationality:

City:

 

 

Please write your answers to the following hypothetical questions.

  1. You missed your grandfather few years ago. Now an old friend asks you about him. How would you inform him/her that your grandfather is dead?

Answer:

  1. Unfortunately your friend got paralyzed in a car accident recently. How would you break this news to your other friend who does not know?

Answer:

  1. Your friend borrowed some money from you and has not paid you back. Now you need the money. How would you ask for your money back?

Answer:

  1. Your brother painted your room, and did a very bad job of it, messing up the walls. You’re really displeased with his work. How would you express that to him?

Answer:

  1. While you are hosting a formal dinner party, you get an urgent need to go to the toilet. What might you say before leaving the table?

Answer:

  1. You go to a fancy restaurant with your family, and unfortunately the food tastes bad. When you are about to leave the restaurant, the manager asks you about the quality of the food. What would you say?

Answer:

  1. Two of your friends are seeing each other secretly and you noticed it. How would you reveal this information to another close friend of yours?

Answer:

  1. You are the manager of the store and you want to fire one of your lazy employees. How would you break this news to him/her?

Answer:

  1. One of your classmates died in an accident last week. Your professor does not know [unlikely!] and asks you about your classmate’s continued absence from class. How would you respond to that?

Answer:

  1. Suppose you are a doctor who recently found out that one of his patients got cancer. How would you break this news to the patient’s wife?

Answer:

  1. Your friend has body odor and sits next to you in class. You cannot tolerate the situation anymore and decide to tell him/her about your problem with it. What would you say?

Answer:

  1. You are in cafeteria reading an article in the newspaper about women’s rape crisis. Suddenly one of your co-workers enters the room and asks you what you are reading about. What would you say to him/her?

Answer:

 

 

 

 

Posted November 23, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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it iis just me alvin   Leave a comment

Extremely Racist Anti-Japanese WWII Film   Leave a comment

 

 

 

Anti-Japanese sentiments range from animositytowards the Japanese government‘s actions anddisdain for Japanese culture to racism against the Japanese people. Sentiments of dehumanization have been fueled by the anti-Japanese propagandaof the Allied governments in World War II; this propaganda was often of a racially disparaging character. Anti-Japanese sentiment may be strongest in China, North Korea, and South Korea,[4][5][6][7] due to atrocities committed by the Japanese military.[not in citation given]

In the past, anti-Japanese sentiment contained innuendos of Japanese people as barbaric. Following the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Japan was intent to adopt Western ways in an attempt to join the West as an industrialized imperial power, but a lack of acceptance of the Japanese in the West complicated integration and assimilation. One commonly held view was that the Japanese were evolutionarily inferior. (Navarro 2000, “… a date which will live in infamy”) Japanese culture was viewed with suspicion and even disdain.

While passions have settled somewhat since Japan’s defeat in World War II, tempers continue to flare on occasion over the widespread perception that the Japanese government has made insufficient penance for their past atrocities, or has sought to whitewash the history of these events.[8] Today, though the Japanese government has effected somecompensatory measures, anti-Japanese sentiment continues based on historical and nationalist animosities linked to Imperial Japanese military aggression and atrocities. Japan’s delay in clearing more than 700,000 (according to the Japanese Government[9]) pieces of life-threatening and environment contaminating chemical weaponsburied in China at the end of World War II is another cause of anti-Japanese sentiment.

Periodically, individuals within Japan spur external criticism. Former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumiwas heavily criticized by South Korea and China for annually paying his respects to the war dead atYasukuni Shrine, which enshrines all those who fought and died for Japan during World War II, including 1,068 convicted war criminals. Right-wing nationalist groups have produced history textbooks whitewashing Japanese atrocities,[10] and the recurring controversies over these books occasionally attract hostile foreign attention.

Some anti-Japanese sentiment originates from business practices used by some Japanese companies, such as dumping.

Results of 2014 BBC World Service poll.
Views of Japan’s influence by country[2]
Sorted by Pos-Neg
Country polled Positive Negative Neutral Pos-Neg
 China
5%
90%
5 -85
 South Korea
15%
79%
6 -64
 Germany
28%
46%
26 -18
 India
27%
29%
44 -2
 Mexico
38%
25%
37 13
 Spain
46%
30%
24 16
 Kenya
45%
26%
29 19
 Turkey
40%
18%
42 22
 France
58%
34%
8 24
 Pakistan
46%
21%
33 25
 Argentina
43%
16%
41 27
 Canada
58%
30%
12 28
 Israel
43%
12%
45 31
 Australia
59%
26%
15 33
 Russia
49%
12%
39 37
 Ghana
59%
21%
20 38
 Peru
59%
19%
22 40
 United Kingdom
65%
24%
11 41
 United States
66%
23%
11 43
 Japan
50%
6%
44 44
 Brazil
70%
19%
11 51
 Indonesia
70%
14%
16 56
 Nigeria
72%
13%
15 59
Results of 2013 Pew Research Center poll.[3]
Asia/Pacific Views of Japan
Sorted by Favorable – Unfavorable
Country polled Favorable Unfavorable Neutral Fav – Unfav
 China
4%
90%
6% -86%
 South Korea
22%
77%
1% -55%
 Pakistan
51%
7%
42% 44%
 Philippines
78%
18%
4% 60%
 Australia
78%
16%
6% 62%
 Indonesia
79%
12%
9% 67%
 Malaysia
80%
6%
14% 74%

Posted November 7, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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U.S. Army – Booby Traps – Banned Cartoons   Leave a comment

Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945 during World War II. The films were designed to instruct service personnel about security, proper sanitation habits, booby traps and other military subjects, and to improve troop morale.

The series was directed by Chuck Jones and other prominent Hollywood animators, and the voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc.

 

 

Posted November 7, 2015 by Teacher Alvin in LEARNING ENGLISH

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