Amish On Break National Geographic!! see the difference!!!   2 comments

Amish Buggy

Amish Buggy (Photo credit: c

Can I seriously watching one documentary where Amish teens don’t get into drugs, drinking, sex and partying all because they think that’s all American or Brit teens do? And with that, can I watch one where they go to a city and they aren’t told that it’s all rape murder and drugs? Like seriously!

The Amish is a “backward” culture when it comes to marriage. They are confined as one group, they dont socialize with other people outside their community, their bloodlines are the same, thus, there is a great risk of producing mutant offspring.

The Amish (play /ˈɑːmɪʃ/ AH-mish; Pennsylvania Dutch: Amisch, German: Amische), sometimes referred to as Amish Mennonites, are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships that form a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish are known for simple living, plain dress, and reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology. The history of the Amish church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists in 1693 led by Jakob Ammann.[2] Those who followed Ammann became known as Amish.[3]

In the early 18th century, many Amish and Mennonites emigrated to Pennsylvania for a variety of reasons. Today, the most traditional descendants of the Amish continue to speak Pennsylvania German, also known as Pennsylvania Dutch. However, a dialect of Swiss German predominates in some Old Order Amish communities, especially in the American state of Indiana.[4] As of 2000, over 165,000 Old Order Amish live in the United States and approximately 1500 live in Canada.[5] A 2008 study suggested their numbers have increased to 227,000,[6] and in 2010 a study suggested their population had grown by 10% in the past two years to 249,000, with increasing movement to the West.[1]

Amish church membership begins with baptism, usually between the ages of 16 and 25. It is a requirement for marriage, and once a person has affiliated with the church, he or she may marry only within the faith. Church districts average between 20 and 40 families, and worship services are held every other Sunday in a member’s home. The district is led by a bishop and several ministers and deacons.[7] The rules of the church, the Ordnung, must be observed by every member. These rules cover most aspects of day-to-day living, and include prohibitions or limitations on the use of power-line electricity, telephones, and automobiles, as well as regulations on clothing. Many Amish church members may not buy insurance or accept government assistance such as Social Security. As Anabaptists, Amish church members practice nonresistance and will not perform any type of military service.

Members who do not conform to these expectations and who cannot be convinced to repent are excommunicated. In addition to excommunication, members may be shunned,[8] a practice that limits social contacts to shame the wayward member into returning to the church. Almost 90% of Amish teenagers choose to be baptized and join the church.[8] During adolescence rumspringa (“running around”) in some communities, nonconforming behavior that would result in the shunning of an adult who had made the permanent commitment of baptism, may meet with a degree of forbearance.[9] Amish church groups seek to maintain a degree of separation from the non-Amish (English) world. There is generally a heavy emphasis on church and family relationships. They typically operate their own one-room schools and discontinue formal education at grade eight (age 13/14).[8] They value rural life, manual labor and humility.

Contents

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History

Cover of "Little Known Facts About The Amish and the Mennonites. A study of the Social customs and Habits of Pennsylvania's Plain People. By Ammon Monroe Aurand, Jr. Aurand Press. 1938.

Cover The Amish and the Mennonites, 1938

Cemetery filled many small plain headstones with simple inscriptions, and two large bare trees.

An old Amish cemetery in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1941.

The Amish Mennonite movement descends from the 16th century fellowship known as the Swiss Brethren.[10] The Swiss Brethren were Anabaptists, and are often viewed as having been a part of the Radical Reformation. “Anabaptist” means “one who baptizes again” – a reference to those who had been baptized as infants, but later adopted a belief in “believer’s baptism”, and then let themselves again be baptized as adults. These Swiss Brethren trace their origins to Felix Manz (ca. 1498–1527) and Conrad Grebel (ca. 1498–1526), who had broken from reformer Huldrych Zwingli.[11]

The Amish movement takes its name from Jakob Ammann (c. 1656–1730), a Swiss Mennonite leader. Ammann believed Mennonites, the peaceful Anabaptists of the Low Countries and Germany, were drifting away from the teachings of Menno Simons and the 1632 Mennonite Dordrecht Confession of Faith. Ammann favored stronger church discipline, including a more rigid application of shunning, the social exclusion of excommunicated members. Swiss Anabaptists, who were scattered by persecution throughout the Alsace and the Electorate of the Palatinate, never practiced strict shunning as had some lowland Anabaptists.[citation needed] Ammann insisted upon this practice, even to the point of expecting spouses to refuse to eat with each other, until the banned spouse repented.[12] This type of strict literalism, on this issue, as well as others, brought about a division among the Mennonites of Southern Germany, the Alsace and Switzerland in 1693, and led to withdrawal of those who sided with Ammann.

Swiss Anabaptism developed, from this point, in two parallel streams. Those following Ammann became known as Amish or Amish Mennonite. The others eventually formed the basis of the Swiss Mennonite Conference. Because of this common heritage, Amish and Mennonites retain many similarities. Those who leave the Amish fold tend to join various congregations of Conservative Mennonites.[13][14]

Amish Mennonites began migrating to Pennsylvania in the 18th century as part of a larger migration from the Palatinate and neighboring areas. This migration was a reaction to religious wars, poverty, and religious persecution on the Continent.[citation needed] The first Amish immigrants went to Berks County, Pennsylvania, but later moved, motivated by land issues and by security concerns tied to the French and Indian War.[citation needed] Many eventually settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Other groups later settled in, or spread to Alabama, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Maryland, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Maine, and Ontario, Canada.

The Amish congregations remaining in Europe slowly merged with the Mennonites. The last Amish congregation to merge was the Ixheim Amish congregation, which merged with the neighboring Mennonite Church in 1937. Some Mennonite congregations, including most in Alsace, are descended directly from former Amish congregations.[15][page needed]

Most Amish communities that were established in North America did not ultimately retain their Amish identity. The original major split that resulted in the loss of identity occurred in the 1860s. During that decade Dienerversammlungen (ministerial conferences) were held in Wayne County, Ohio, concerning how the Amish should deal with the pressures of modern society. The meetings themselves were a progressive idea; for bishops to assemble to discuss uniformity was an unprecedented notion in the Amish church.[citation needed] By the first several meetings, the more traditionally minded bishops agreed to boycott the conferences. The more progressive members, comprising approximately two thirds of the group, retained the name Amish Mennonite. Many of these eventually united with the Mennonite Church, and other Mennonite denominations, especially in the early 20th century. The more traditionally minded groups became known as the Old Order Amish.[16]

Religious practices

Main article: Amish religious practices
A page of ornate old German text. See description.

A scan of the historical document Diß Lied haben die sieben Brüder im Gefängnüß zu Gmünd gemacht

See description.

Amish couple in horse-driven buggy in rural Holmes County, Ohio, September 2004)

Two key concepts for understanding Amish practices are their rejection of Hochmut (pride, arrogance, haughtiness) and the high value they place on Demut (humility) and Gelassenheit (calmness, composure, placidity), often translated as “submission” or “letting-be”. Gelassenheit is perhaps better understood as a reluctance to be forward, to be self-promoting, or to assert oneself. The Amish’s willingness to submit to the “Will of Jesus”, expressed through group norms, is at odds with the individualism so central to the wider American culture. The Amish anti-individualist orientation is the motive for rejecting labor-saving technologies that might make one less dependent on community. Modern innovations like electricity might spark a competition for status goods, or photographs might cultivate personal vanity.

Way of life

Main article: Amish way of life

Amish lifestyle is dictated by the Ordnung[8] (German, meaning: order), which differs slightly from community to community, and, within a community, from district to district. What is acceptable in one community may not be acceptable in another. No summary of Amish lifestyle and culture can be totally adequate, because there are few generalities that are true for all Amish. Groups may separate over matters such as the width of a hat-brim, the color of buggies, or other issues.[citation needed]

Bearing children, raising them, and socializing with neighbors and relatives are the greatest functions of the Amish family. All Amish believe large families are a blessing from God.

Language

Main article: Pennsylvania German language

The Amish speak in Pennsylvania Dutch and refer to non-Amish as “English”.[8] According to one scholar, “today, almost all Amish are functionally bilingual in Pennsylvania Dutch and English; however, domains of usage are sharply separated. Pennsylvania Dutch dominates in most in-group settings, such as the dinner table and preaching in church services. In contrast, English is used for most reading and writing. English is also the medium of instruction in schools and is used in business transactions and often, out of politeness, in situations involving interactions with non-Amish. Finally, the Amish read prayers and sing in Standard German, or High German (Hoch Deitsch) at church services. The distinctive use of three different languages serves as a powerful conveyor of Amish identity.”[17] Although “the English language is being used in more and more situations,” Pennsylvania Dutch is “one of a handful of minority languages in the United States that is neither endangered nor supported by continual arrivals of immigrants.”[18]

Population and distribution

Amish family shopping near Niagara Falls, Ontario

See also List of U.S. states by Amish population
Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1920 5,000
1928 7,000 +40.0%
1936 9,000 +28.6%
1944 13,000 +44.4%
1952 19,000 +46.2%
1960 28,000 +47.4%
1968 39,000 +39.3%
1976 57,000 +46.2%
1984 84,000 +47.4%
1992 125,000 +48.8%
2000 166,000 +32.8%
2008 221,000 +33.1%
2010 249,000 +12.7%
US Populations
sources: 221,000 in 2008;[6] 249,000 in 2010.[1]

Because members usually get baptized no earlier than 18 and children are not counted in local congregation numbers, it is difficult to put an exact figure on the number of Amish. Rough estimates from various studies have placed their numbers at 125,000 in 1992; 166,000 in 2000; and 221,000 in 2008.[19] Thus, from 1992 to 2008, population growth among the Amish in North America was 84% (3.6% per year). During that time they established 184 new settlements and moved into six new states.[20] In 2000, approximately 165,620

 

2 responses to “Amish On Break National Geographic!! see the difference!!!

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